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Sterling Sharpe: End 2 End
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The title screen for an unreleased Japanese version of the game called "Super American Football" can be found in the game's data.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Clock Tower II: The Struggle Within
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On the wall of Ashley's bedroom, you can find a poster of the previous game's Japanese box art, released under the title "Clock Tower 2", and featuring Jennifer. When examined, Alyssa remarks "This isn't a game!" in reference to it being localized outside Japan as the first Clock Tower game despite it being a sequel, since the actual first Clock Tower game was never released outside Japan.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Super Mario Sunshine
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In the Japanese version, the texture for signposts uses English placeholder text taken from a dictionary, with some portions inexplicably removed. The unaltered text reads "This isn't gonna hurt a bit. Just a little stick. Ready? 1...2...3. There you go. All done," while the text that appears in-game reads "This isn't gonna Just a little stick. Ready? 1...2...3. There you All do." The international release replaces the text with a series of unreadable, swirl-shaped glyphs.
Contributed by game4brains
Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne
In the Nocturne Mainax version that features Dante from the Devil May Cry series as a guest character, jumping from the Mantra Headquarters will normally cause your party's HP to be reduced to 1 HP. However, if Dante is in your party, he will take no damage from the fall.

In the Nocturne Chronicle version only released in Japan featuring Raidou from the Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Summoner games replacing Dante, he also takes no damage if you jump from the building.

These appear to be references to how each character can fall from great heights and land without any visible damage, such as in the beginning of Devil May Cry 2 where Dante successfully lands a jump from a tall cathedral tower.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Kirby's Dream Collection
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The Japanese release of the game includes scans from the official manga "Kirby of the Stars" by Yoshiko Sakuma; these are omitted in international releases.
Contributed by game4brains
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The North American box art appears to feature a less-detailed replica of Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in California.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
Normally, if you change the music selection to "Choose" in the Audio menu, the game will not allow the track "Prophetic - Title" to play. However, a glitch in the European version causes the song to play if the player loops through the list by pressing D-Right after the last song. This is the only way the song can be played in-game, though the game will change the song to "Azule Lux" every time a new level is loaded.

This is most likely caused by the game trying to play "Extol", as it was the last track in the US version. Since its placement was changed, the game loops the list and plays "Prophetic" instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
The song "Flim Flam" is not present in the European version. The Brick variation which used this song now uses "Extol" instead, which is also the song that replaced it on the Audio menu.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Super Smash Bros. Melee
Although Banjo and Kazooie from Banjo-Kazooie would not appear in the series until Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, their names appear as two of the random default names selected in the Name Entry in the Japanese version of Super Smash Bros. Melee. The same is true for Conker from Conker's Bad Fur Day, another Rare character.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Final Fight 2
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At the end of the second phase of the France level (known in-game as round 2) there's a sign that says that the player is going to an airport (called aeroport in-game). The Japanese version mentions the real life Charles de Gaulle airport while the international version removes the name and changes "AEROPORT" into "AERO PORT".
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Final Fight 2
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In the Japanese version the pillars in the background of the France level (also known as Round 2 in-game) has graffiti peace signs painted on them. These graffiti were changed in the international version so that they no longer resemble peace signs.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
The Punisher
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Punisher and Nick Fury's special kick moves (Flaming Sonic Kick and Flaming Flip Kick, respectively) set the enemy on fire in the Japanese version while in the international version these attacks make the enemy bleed.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
The Punisher
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Both playable characters have a flying fire kick move that can only be done in the Japanese version. It is unknown why this attack was removed from the international version of the game.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
X-Men vs. Street Fighter
The Japanese version features pre-battle dialogue between Apocalypse and every single playable character. These intro dialogues were not translated and instead they were removed from the international versions of the game.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
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Exclusive to the Japanese console version of the game are four multiplayer skins based off Yakuza characters Kazuma Kiryu, Shun Akiyama, Ryuji Goda, and Goro Majima.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated in the description for "Under the Stars" that he figures “‘I should write a normal song’, but when I do, oh my!” He also commented that the frequency range on the song’s instrumentation was “a little overstuffed”.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that when his older brother Sakimoto heard the "Night Attack" theme, he said to Iwata that the theme sounded like it was done by a foreigner trying to write something that sounds "Japanese". Iwata took it as a harsh comment, but agreed with him, admitting that he was too influenced by playing a lot of Western games at the time. He really wanted the atmosphere to feel like a night raid, but the latter half of the song "sounds like all the soldiers are dancing around or something".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In January 1997 interview with Yuji Naka and Naoto Ohshima published in the Sega Magazine about their early days working for the company, he was told by an interviewer about the game (specifically talking about the original Japanese version based on Fist of the North Star) being a masterpiece on the Master System. He asked Naka if he was asked to make it? He responded:

"No, I didn’t. To tell the truth, Hokuto no Ken wasn’t really my thing. The reason why is really stupid, but in high school I had good friend who I had a falling out with, and this friend loved Hokuto no Ken… so after that experience, I just couldn’t get into it.

I joined Sega when I was 18, and before long they asked me to make Hokuto no Ken… I was like, "seriously?" But I did the programming all the same, and I also created the bosses and henchmen too. The planner gave me a rough outline of what kind of characters they were, and when I got really lost, I would read the relevant parts of the comic. “Oh, I see now… he’s like this.”

So I understand why people think I must love Hokuto no Ken, but that wasn’t the case."

Ohshima commented on Naka's response, that he had never heard that story before and it made him think "ah hah, so that’s why he wouldn’t let me do the musclemen type characters I’ve wanted to draw for so long."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the "Decisive Battle" felt out of step with the game's historical period. He felt it was more like "a muscle-bound action hero wielding a gatling gun in one hand", instead of wielding sword and sorcery, and apologized if it sounded a little phoned in, adding "I'd do it differently now".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he joked that he wrote "Bloody Excrement" while he was thinking about the game's protagonist, Mr. Forest Bear, a "pleasant, heartwarming tale of Mr. Bear’s family adventure, that's really never explained", and that his original idea for the song was to make it feel like a pleasant, heartwarming story of Mr. Bear’s family adventure.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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