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Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island
In the Game Boy Advance port of the game, 2 of the secret levels have different names depending on the region:

• The level titled "Fight Toadies w/ Toadies" in the North American version of the game is named "Fight Baddies w/ Baddies" in the PAL Regions.

• The level titled "Endless World of Yoshis" in the North American version of the game is named "Crazy Maze Days" in the PAL Regions.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
Darkstalkers 3
According to general producer Noritaka Funamizu in the Gamest magazine interview, he named the third game for Japan “Vampire Savior” because he wanted each title to have a unique name instead of just calling it by it's early name 'Vampire 3'. He added "As for the meaning, I’ll leave that for players to discover."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Castlevania: Rondo of Blood
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In the Akumajo Dracula X CD liner notes, the game's character designer Toshiharu Furukawa stated that they had to remove some monsters in previous Castlevania games, due to the game's international localizations. Having destructible monsters with humanoid forms (i.e. Medusa, Carmilla, and Gargoyle) went against America's morals. However, for Castlevania: Rondo of Blood, it doesn't need to be localized, due to it being released in Japan-only.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain
Big Boss' final vision of Paz in censored the Japanese version of the game. The scene is altered by using different camera angles and animations of of Paz to obscure gore. In a later update for Steam/PC, this scene was also censored worldwide.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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Shortly after its release onto the Nintendo Switch, the game was removed from sale from the North American Nintendo eShop due to containing content deemed beyond acceptable for the ESRB rating it was given. It was re-released on March 20th, 2020 as Lust for Darkness: Dawn Edition with the explicit content and sexual imagery toned down. The European release however remained unaltered with the "Dawn Edition" also added to the European Nintendo eShop.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
The game has two different titles between the North American and UK versions. In the US the game is referred to as Clubhouse Games: 51 Worldwide Classics, whereas in the UK it's called 51 Worldwide Games. Another change is that Checkers and Toy Soccer are called Draughts and Toy Football respectively in the UK version.
Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes
In international versions, there's a cutscene of removing the bomb from inside of Paz's stomach at the end of the main mission. The Japanese version however adjusts the camera angle so that no blood and gore is shown on screen.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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NSFW - This trivia is considered "Not Safe for Work" - Click to Reveal
The Japanese version of the game contains downloadable maps featuring Japanese swimsuit model Yukie Kawamara that was only accessible via codes that were in specially marked boxes. In these maps, Kawamara's breasts are small bumps in the platforms that the player can roll on. This may have been deemed inappropriate for a kid-friendly game, which is why it hasn't been available in other countries for download since its release.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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In Australia & New Zealand, the game was released as Ricky Ponting International Cricket 2007 and in India as Yuvraj Singh International Cricket 2007, with on the covers cricketers Ricky Ponting and Yuvraj Singh; respectively.

Singh was also a brand ambassador for the Xbox 360 in India.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The game was released in North America as Sim Theme Park, part of Maxis' "Sim" brand of games, whilst in Europe and Asia it retained the "Theme" brand and was released as Theme Park World. The reason for the difference in title was because the "Sim" brand was more recognizable in the United States, as opposed to the "Theme" name which was more popular in the rest of the world.

According to Luc Barthelet, the General Manager of Maxis, he was jealous and wished Maxis had created the game but appreciated the opportunity to have it as part of the Sim franchise.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The game was first released in 1998 on the PlayStation exclusively in Japan as Theme Aquarium, part of the "Theme" series of games by Bullfrog Productions. However, when it was released in 2000 for the PC exclusively in Europe, it was simply titled Aquarium with the "Theme" name and any mentions of Bullfrog Productions dropped.

The reason for the PlayStation version featuring the "Theme" brand was that the previous Theme games had proved popular in Japan so publisher EA Square wanted to help further generate interest by asking Bullfrog to use it in its marketing. When porting it to the PC for the West, the reason to simply release it as Aquarium was due to the belief that "the game quality wasn't high enough for it it come out in the West as a Theme game, with the Bullfrog brand," according to Shintaro Kanaoya, who provided localization assistance.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
Shining Force
In an 'Shining Force Encyclopedia' interview with game's Producer/Designer Hiroyuki Takahashi, he was asked how his team came up with the Japanese title "Shining Force: The Legacy of the Gods". Takahashi stated: "We had a few different candidates for titles. The one we chose was suggested by the scenario writer. Originally, the title was simply 'Kamigami no Isan' ('Legacy of the Gods'). I’m something of a sci-fi diehard, and I read a bunch of sci-fi novels that had similar-sounding titles, like “the ___ of the ___”, so that’s why we settled on this one."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Abby Trott, the vocalist of the English version of Lifelight, stated in a interview that she actually cried upon hearing that she would be involved in "Super Smash Bros. Ultimate." Trott, herself, was a Nintendo fan and hearing about this made her feel "very special."

“I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to audition through Cup of Tea Productions, and at the time I had no idea what the audition was for. For the first round, I submitted my singing demo. The second round involved singing a requested song (not ‘Lifelight’). I ended up being cast, and CRIED when I found out what the project was. As a life-long fan of Nintendo, being a part of Smash Bros. Ultimate is really special to me. I love ‘Lifelight’ so much.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
Eleven of the game's licensed songs from the Japanese PlayStation version were removed in international release, instead utilizing four songs from Dance Dance Revolution 4th Mix and DDRMAX.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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The North American version contains only Landon Donovan on the front cover, while the European version, known as FIFA Football 2003, has Roberto Carlos, Ryan Giggs, and Edger Davids on it instead.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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Within the second level of the Clock Tower stage, there's a hidden exit which in the Japanese version when entered will feature a cameo by a Japanese personality accompanied with a secret message from them. If encountered on either easy or normal difficulty, idol Hiroko Nakayama will appear with a different message on each difficulty. When encountered on hard mode, Weekly Famitsu chief editor Hirokazu Hamamura will appear. Both personalities were hosts of the video game TV show Game Catalogue II which also mentioned the secret in the July 8, 1995 episode with behind the scenes footage shown in the July 22, 1995 episode.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
Streets of Rage 3
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Ash is a mini boss that can only be encountered in Japanese versions of the game. He's a homosexual who's very stereotypical in both appearance and behavior. He prances around the stage, lets out a feminine laugh when he grabs the player and uses the female voice cry when defeated in battle. He can be unlocked as a playable character by pressing and holding the B button when he is defeated. He is the strongest out of all the characters and attacks fast.

Ash was removed from the North American and European versions of the game likely because of the obvious backlash SEGA would've received. His boss theme can still be heard but only in the BGM test screen.
Contributed by ShyanVixen
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The game was released as "NHL Pro '99" in Europe.
Contributed by GamerBen144
GoldenEye 007
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Censored Gaming asked 'Martin Molls', the game's director, why the 'Hunting Knife' was removed from the Japanese localisation. He stated that it was related to the 'Kobe Child Murders', an incident in Japan, involving child murder and knives.

This change is believed to have affected Rare's later game 'Perfect Dark' for the same reason.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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The American version has New York Yankees batter Aaron Judge on the cover of the game, while the Canadian version has Marcus Stroman from the Toronto Blue Jays.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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