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Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that when his older brother Sakimoto heard the "Night Attack" theme, he said to Iwata that the theme sounded like it was done by a foreigner trying to write something that sounds "Japanese". Iwata took it as a harsh comment, but agreed with him, admitting that he was too influenced by playing a lot of Western games at the time. He really wanted the atmosphere to feel like a night raid, but the latter half of the song "sounds like all the soldiers are dancing around or something".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In January 1997 interview with Yuji Naka and Naoto Ohshima published in the Sega Magazine about their early days working for the company, he was told by an interviewer about the game (specifically talking about the original Japanese version based on Fist of the North Star) being a masterpiece on the Master System. He asked Naka if he was asked to make it? He responded:

"No, I didn’t. To tell the truth, Hokuto no Ken wasn’t really my thing. The reason why is really stupid, but in high school I had good friend who I had a falling out with, and this friend loved Hokuto no Ken… so after that experience, I just couldn’t get into it.

I joined Sega when I was 18, and before long they asked me to make Hokuto no Ken… I was like, "seriously?" But I did the programming all the same, and I also created the bosses and henchmen too. The planner gave me a rough outline of what kind of characters they were, and when I got really lost, I would read the relevant parts of the comic. “Oh, I see now… he’s like this.”

So I understand why people think I must love Hokuto no Ken, but that wasn’t the case."

Ohshima commented on Naka's response, that he had never heard that story before and it made him think "ah hah, so that’s why he wouldn’t let me do the musclemen type characters I’ve wanted to draw for so long."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the "Decisive Battle" felt out of step with the game's historical period. He felt it was more like "a muscle-bound action hero wielding a gatling gun in one hand", instead of wielding sword and sorcery, and apologized if it sounded a little phoned in, adding "I'd do it differently now".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he joked that he wrote "Bloody Excrement" while he was thinking about the game's protagonist, Mr. Forest Bear, a "pleasant, heartwarming tale of Mr. Bear’s family adventure, that's really never explained", and that his original idea for the song was to make it feel like a pleasant, heartwarming story of Mr. Bear’s family adventure.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that he'd tried to evoke "the feeling that you were fighting in the midst of mother nature all around you" for "A Chapel".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that the "Random Waltz" theme was his very first battle theme he wrote, and it served as something like a test for different sampling techniques he wanted to experiment with, which he found very memorable. He also stated that, at the time of this interview, when he thought back on when he wrote the theme, it felt like it was 5 years ago, but it was actually only half a year.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the title for "Back Fire" is actually “Chotto Otona no Daakuman” (“A More Mature Darkman”). A few years prior for the game Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together, he composed the last boss theme named “Darkman Abikyoukan” (“Darkman Pandemonium”), which he described as an "up-tempo, kind of insane sounding song" on a level of madness that "Back Fire" couldn't quite reach, hence the title.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Last of Us Part I
In The Last of Us Remastered's commentary with actress Ashley Johnson and director Neil Druckmann, in the scene where Joel found Ellie in the abandoned house, Ashley stated that she improvised by shoving him out of frustration, because she felt emotional reading for the scene where Joel is planning to leave her to Tommy.

Druckmann stated that the team wanted him to remove this scene where Joel is being too cold to Ellie, but he refused because he felt it was important to keep in the scene that Ellie is "being so vulnerable and [Joel is] having these feelings. He's trying to shut it down". Druckmann also commented that when Joel said to Ellie "You're not my daughter", he stated that while that quote is almost an insult, it's the opposite of what he actually feels.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that "Run Past Through The Plain" ended up being the third battle theme. He thought that the two previous battle themes were too "in your face", so he decided to create a song with a central melody that sounded more friendly. Eventually it ended up sounding like "something you’d hear at a matsuri (local festival)".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the theme for "Unavoidable Battle" was the first battle theme he created. Before "Unavoidable Battle", he created another battle theme before it, but it felt too happy-sounding, so the team rejected it. As he reflected on it, he created "Unavoidable Battle" to be a more pointed, exaggerated song, while the rejected music was re-purposed and used for the Unit Introduction theme, which is played over the opening demo.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Last of Us Part I
In The Last of Us Remastered's commentary with director Neil Druckmann, he stated that Jeffrey Pierce originally auditioned for the role of Joel, which ultimately ended up being given to Troy Baker instead. When the team began finding someone to cast as Tommy, they called Pierce back in and were impressed with his performance, landing him the role of Tommy. Baker stated that he felt a chemistry between himself and Pierce that made for a sense of realism in Joel and Tommy's relationship.

Druckmann also stated that Ashley Scott was originally intended to play Tess instead of Maria, and that there were no auditions for either of those characters.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Yoshi: Topsy-Turvy
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The game is titled "Yoshi’s Universal Gravitation" outside of North America.
Contributed by GamerBen144
The endings in the Japanese version of the game feature voice acting while the English version does not have voice overs.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards
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In the Japanese version, the fourth HUD option is designed after a Japanese calligraphy sheet. In the international release, this is replaced with a new design based on crayon scribbles.
Contributed by game4brains
Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam
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Like Mario & Luigi: Dream Team, Paper Jam also had "Bros." added to its name in the UK release, again with no official reason given.

However, given that there are already two trademarks for "PaperJam" as well as a brand of toys that were sold in the UK under the name "Paper Jamz", it is more than likely Nintendo repeated the easier road by adding "Bros."
Mario & Luigi: Dream Team
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In the UK and Australia, the game is changed to add the "Bros." at the end of the title.

While no official reason was given, the trademark for the name "Dream Team" was filed in the UK in 2010, and was still valid until the games release. It's possible Nintendo added the "Bros." at the end to avoid any legal issues with the trademark.
Tekken 4
The character intro prologues have some slight differences between regions. For example, Bryan Fury's prologue in Japanese states that "Brian came to the realization that his life was quickly coming to an end", while the international release states that "Brian realized that the end of his life was near". Another example is in Paul's prologue, which says that his friends and admirers slowly dissapeared. This is not mentioned in the International version of that character's prologue.

The narrator of these stories also differs between regions. In the Japanese version the narration is done by the game's announcer, Antonio Ploszay. Meanwhile in the international release they are done by an unknown voice actor.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Tekken 4
Marduk and Steve Fox have different English voices depending on the region.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Super Mario 64
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In the European version, the demo clip depicting Mario collecting a ring of coins in Whomp's Fortress sees him grab one less coin than in all other versions of the game, resulting in two coins being left on-screen instead of just one. Oddly, this is the only change made to the game's demo videos between regions.
Contributed by game4brains
Ring of Destruction: Slam Masters II
The artwork for the loser portraits feature dialogue boxes and Japanese onomatopeia in the Japanese version of the game. These were removed in the international release.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
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