Tags

Filter trivia by tag, game, series, console, and/or developer.
Filter Arrow
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that when his older brother Sakimoto heard the "Night Attack" theme, he said to Iwata that the theme sounded like it was done by a foreigner trying to write something that sounds "Japanese". Iwata took it as a harsh comment, but agreed with him, admitting that he was too influenced by playing a lot of Western games at the time. He really wanted the atmosphere to feel like a night raid, but the latter half of the song "sounds like all the soldiers are dancing around or something".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In January 1997 interview with Yuji Naka and Naoto Ohshima published in the Sega Magazine about their early days working for the company, he was told by an interviewer about the game (specifically talking about the original Japanese version based on Fist of the North Star) being a masterpiece on the Master System. He asked Naka if he was asked to make it? He responded:

"No, I didn’t. To tell the truth, Hokuto no Ken wasn’t really my thing. The reason why is really stupid, but in high school I had good friend who I had a falling out with, and this friend loved Hokuto no Ken… so after that experience, I just couldn’t get into it.

I joined Sega when I was 18, and before long they asked me to make Hokuto no Ken… I was like, "seriously?" But I did the programming all the same, and I also created the bosses and henchmen too. The planner gave me a rough outline of what kind of characters they were, and when I got really lost, I would read the relevant parts of the comic. “Oh, I see now… he’s like this.”

So I understand why people think I must love Hokuto no Ken, but that wasn’t the case."

Ohshima commented on Naka's response, that he had never heard that story before and it made him think "ah hah, so that’s why he wouldn’t let me do the musclemen type characters I’ve wanted to draw for so long."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time
In a 1999 commentary with the game's composer Koji Kondo published in the GSLA archive, he stated that when "Ocarina" became the game's title, he decided to try and build the music around one central ocarina melody. Given that the ocarina only has five notes to play, he tried to write the various background themes in different genres (bolero, serenade, etc.) where each one would evoke a "catchy, memorable 3-note ocarina melody". This was the motif around which he created various simple, but distinct melodies, and was very careful to make sure he didn't repeat himself. Kondo then commented:

"Game music is different from other genres in that it exists to make the game more enjoyable. In addition, there's a lot of interactive things you can do with game music, which I think is one of its defining traits. A very simple example would be the way the tempo increases when a time limit is running out."

Kondo also stated the Hyrule Field theme is the main central song, and that he wrote it so that each time you play it, the song structure unfolds in a slightly different way. He also stated that when Link stands still for a while, the song will change to a more relaxed melody, and when enemies come close, the song will get tenser. Since it is a very long game, he tried to think of ways to keep the players from getting bored, and how to make the music evolve with what's happening on-screen. He hoped to continue pursuing this idea for interactive music in future games.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Fatal Fury 3: Road to the Final Victory
In a 1995 interview with the SNK Sound Team published in Neo Geo Freak Magazine, composers Shimizm and Konny stated that the team wanted to change up the patterns and image of each song, as they had to compose a large number of songs for each game they worked on while also adding something new into the image of earlier versions of songs and also relating to what the game was trying to express. By doing this, they set up a distinct identity for each game, always searching to make things more "real":

Shimizm: "Basically, these are fighting games, and their core is a system of gameplay that I endeavor to match with my music. What is the game itself trying to express…? That's where I look for my themes. For sound effects too, for example, with punches, I try to make them as realistic as possible. I place a lot of importance on that."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the "Decisive Battle" felt out of step with the game's historical period. He felt it was more like "a muscle-bound action hero wielding a gatling gun in one hand", instead of wielding sword and sorcery, and apologized if it sounded a little phoned in, adding "I'd do it differently now".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he joked that he wrote "Bloody Excrement" while he was thinking about the game's protagonist, Mr. Forest Bear, a "pleasant, heartwarming tale of Mr. Bear’s family adventure, that's really never explained", and that his original idea for the song was to make it feel like a pleasant, heartwarming story of Mr. Bear’s family adventure.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that he'd tried to evoke "the feeling that you were fighting in the midst of mother nature all around you" for "A Chapel".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that the "Random Waltz" theme was his very first battle theme he wrote, and it served as something like a test for different sampling techniques he wanted to experiment with, which he found very memorable. He also stated that, at the time of this interview, when he thought back on when he wrote the theme, it felt like it was 5 years ago, but it was actually only half a year.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the title for "Back Fire" is actually “Chotto Otona no Daakuman” (“A More Mature Darkman”). A few years prior for the game Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together, he composed the last boss theme named “Darkman Abikyoukan” (“Darkman Pandemonium”), which he described as an "up-tempo, kind of insane sounding song" on a level of madness that "Back Fire" couldn't quite reach, hence the title.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the game's data, found at the offset 0x32E of it's ROM are the strings "MINATO", referencing Minato Giken, the developer company that worked on the game.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In June 2022, cut video game content website The Cutting Room Floor leaked the ROM of an unreleased version planned for the SNES.

According to designer and programmer Jim Burton, publisher Psygnosis cancelled it when it was 80% complete due to poor sales of the Genesis version.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Early versions of the intro to the Spyglass Hills stage can be found in the PlayStation version’s data.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Attachment
A prototype version of this game contained an item, called "Flametrail", which is not present in the final release of the game. It is theorised this item would use the jet engines of the ship as a means of damaging other ships.
Contributed by psyducklover13
Wario and Waluigi play the wrong sound clips when selected in the character roster. When selected, Wario will play Waluigi’s voice clip and vice versa.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Within the Wii version’s files is the intro to the 1997 animated TV show “The Adventures of Sam & Max: Freelance Police.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
New Super Mario Bros. Wii
When playing co-op, a player that loses all their lives during a level while the other player(s) is/are still alive can hold different directions on the D-Pad and then press 1 or 2 to play specific sound effects over the level's music like a snare drum, kick drum, cowbells, clapping, and two jump-like sound effects.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Super Mario 64
Attachment
By standing against the wall between the left and middle paintings for Cool, Cool Mountain and using the first-person view, you can clip the camera through the wall to find what appears to be a large red "F" floating in the void. This is actually part of the entrance to Bowser in the Dark World, a course on the same floor, seen from below.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Half-Life
Attachment
In the bonus co-op mode Half-Life: Decay found in the PlayStation 2 port of the game, the ending of the mode can be seen from the perspectives of either playable character in the game, Gina or Colette. If you see the ending from Colette's perspective, a brief shot of a broken computer can be seen with red electrical arcs shooting out of it. Connecting this arcs in an emulator reveals the initials "MA", the signature of Gearbox Software level designer Matt Armstrong, and a symbol that he would often hide in games he worked on.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Fallout 3
Attachment
An unused set of Enclave Power Armor can be found in the game files and spawned in-game, utilizing console commands.

The stats differ and the armor set carries the file name, "Robo-Thor Armor", evidently a reference to Marvel Comic's Thor, as the armor helmet has a unique design reflective of Thor's own signature helmet.
Contributed by Regen-33
The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt
Attachment
In the Blood and Wine expansion, the quest "The Warble of a Smitten Knight" ends with Geralt lifting a curse laid upon a character named Vivienne, who was partially turned into a bird. In a cutscene prior to lifting the curse without Guillame's help, Geralt warns her that once she becomes human again, she may only live for as long as she spent living with the curse, which is seven years.

Afterwards, waiting seven in-game years after completing the quest will allow you to find Vivienne having collapsed and died inside Yennefer's room in Kaer Trolde in Skellige, although this position is slightly glitched and Geralt can still talk to her as if she were alive. According to the game's lead quest designer Philipp Weber, this buggy appearance was caused by the cloth physics on her dress as dead characters in the game are normally static models, and due to this being one of the last secrets added to the game prior to the end of development, they were unable to fix this in time for release. Coincidentally, this Easter egg was first teased by the developers and discovered by fans in 2022, seven years after the game's release.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Select this option if you'd like to include results that match any of your criteria. Otherwise, only results that match all selected criteria will be returned.