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Mario Part 2 - Easter Egg Hunting
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In the SNES game, the Boos and Big Boo are light blue. In the Game Boy Advance game, the Boos and Big Boo are white.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
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Bowser and the Koopalings all have 3 fingers on their hands in the SNES game. In the Game Boy Advance game, Bowser and the Koopalings all have 4 fingers. His arms were also recolored.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, all of the Yoshi eggs have dull brown spots on them (besides Green Yoshis). In the Game Boy Advance game, the Yoshi eggs all match the color of the Yoshis inside them.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
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In the Game Boy Advance game, Princess Peach has blue earrings, lighter hair and a lighter pink dress. These changes more accurately represent Peach's current look. In the SNES game, Peach has pink earrings along with a darker pink dress and hair.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
A power-up can be found lying on the ground in the last room of #3 Lemmy's Castle. In the SNES game, the power-up is super mushroom; in the Game Boy Advance game, the power-up is a feather.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, when fighting Bowser, only the box with the reserve item appears at the top of the screen. In the Game Boy Advance game, the full HUD is displayed.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In both versions of the game, the seventh room of Bowser's Castle contains statues that spit out flames. The first statue in that room, which appears in the SNES game, is missing in the Game Boy Advance version.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
The player can re-play a castle by simultaneously pressing the L and R buttons in the SNES game. In the Game Boy Advance game, the player cannot re-play a castle until Bowser is defeated; after Bowser is defeated, the player can then re-play the castles by entering it the same way they enter any other level.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, punching a Climbing Koopa awarded 100 points. In the Game Boy Advance game, this was changed to 400 points.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
Points awarded in the SNES game are lower than the Game Boy Advance game for defeating Charging Chuck. Also, in the Game Boy Advance game, coins are awarded for defeating Charging Chuck with fireballs.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
Yoshi turns into Blue Yoshi if he has wings when a level is completed in the SNES game. In the Game Boy Advance game, Yoshi will not change into Blue Yoshi if he has wings when completing a level.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
Yoshi can spit the key out after entering a keyhole in the SNES game. This was removed from the Game Boy Advance game.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, Mario and Luigi can not spin jump on some enemies that they can in the Game Boy Advance game, such as Boos and Podoboos. Also, in the Game Boy Advance game, Yoshi can jump off of fish enemies.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
By holding the run button, Mario and Luigi can climb vines faster in the Game Boy Advance game.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, Yoshi will always produce an egg containing a mushroom when he eats ten red berries. In the Game Boy Advance version Green Yoshi will produce an egg with a mushroom, Blue Yoshi will produce an egg with a feather, Red Yoshi will produce an egg with a Fire Flower, and Yellow Yoshi will produce and egg with a Starman.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, Yoshi has orange arms regardless of his body color, though he has green arms on the SNES box art. In the Game Boy Advance version, Yoshi's arms are the same color as his body.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, player 1 controls Mario and player 2 controls Luigi. In the Game Boy Advance game, the player can choose to play as either Mario or Luigi by pressing the R button on the world map. Additionally, in the SNES version Luigi is an exact copy of Mario with a different color palette. In the Game Boy Advance version, Luigi was changed in several ways including:
• Luigi is taller and skinnier than Mario and more closely resembles his modern apperance. Luigi also wears blue overalls instead of his purple overalls from the SNES version.
• Luigi jumps higher, moves slower, and scuttles in mid-air much like he does in Super Mario Bros. 2 (U.S. version). He also runs slower and has worse traction than Mario.
• Luigi flies higher with his cape than Mario, but also flies slower.
• Fireballs from Fire Luigi bounce higher.
• When Luigi rides Yoshi, Yoshi doesn't instantly eat enemies; Yoshi can spit enemies out, and use some of them as weapons, but swallows them after 7-8 seconds.
• All coins will fall out of a block if Luigi hits it, whereas the coins come out one-by-one when Mario hits the same block.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the Game Boy Advance game, earning at least 10 lives consecutively will cause a flower and the number of lives earned to scroll across the screen.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, the player can only save after completing certain stages or finishing any Ghost House or Fortress. In the Game Boy Advance game, the player can save inside of a course or on the world map; the Game Boy Advance game also saves the player's power-ups and life count, whereas the SNES version starts the player out as Small Mario with 5 lives each time a saved file is loaded.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the Game Boy Advance game, different colored Yoshis can be found in question blocks on regular stages after finding each colored Yoshi on Star Road. Cape Mario/Cape Luigi can find a blue Yoshi, Fire Mario/Fire Luigi can find a red Yoshi, and Super Mario/Super Luigi and Small Mario/Small Luigi can find a yellow or green Yoshi. In the SNES game, only green Yoshis can be found in question blocks outside of Star Road and the Special World.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
Ghost houses and Fortresses do not have Dragon Coins on the SNES version, but appear in every level in the Game Boy Advance version. Because of this change, some level designs were reconfigured. The Dragon Coins will also turn into Peach Coins (after a cutscene) if all five Dragon Coins are collected in every single level in the Game Boy Advance game.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES version, the maximum number of lives a player can have is 99. In the Game Boy Advance version, this was changed to 999.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES version, enemy changes and Autumn-colored levels appear after completing the Special World. In the Game Boy Advance version, all 96 exits must be cleared instead.

Additionally, the Game Boy Advance version includes a cutscene showing Luigi in a balloon tossing out masks to the Koopas after unlocking the Autumn-colored levels, whereas the changes in the SNES version are first seen when entering Yoshi's house upon exiting the Special World.

Galoombas and Pokeys also have different appearances in the Game Boy Advance version, along with Koopas, Bullet Bills and Piranha plants like the SNES version.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, when Mario or Luigi gets hurt while having a power-up (i.e. fire flower or cape), Mario and Luigi will become Small Mario/Small Luigi, as they did in Super Mario Bros. In the Game Boy Advance game, Power-up Mario/Power-up Luigi will become Super Mario/Super Luigi when they are hurt, as they do in Super Mario Bros. 3. In both versions, if Super Mario/Super Luigi get hurt, the reserve item in the box at the top of the screen will drop down.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES version, the "Top Secret Area" stage is a yellow dot on the map. In the Game Boy Advance version, a smiling bush represents the stage.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, the timer for Bowser's Castle is 400 seconds; there is no time limit when fighting Bowser. In the Game Boy Advance game, the timer was increased to 800 seconds if entering through the front door and 600 seconds if entering from the back door due to the timer continues when fighting Bowser.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, the "Top Secret Area" stage does not have a timer. In the Game Boy Advance game, the "Top Secret Area" has 200 seconds on the timer.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
A status menu is accessible on the world map by pressing the Select button on the Game Boy Advance version. The status menu allows the player to see total play time, score, the number of exits found by each brother, whether Princess Peach has been saved, and whether all of Dragon coins have been collected.

After completing all exits on every level, a stage select screen will also become available that will take the player to any chosen level.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
In the SNES game, the maximum number of lives a player could have is 99. In the Game Boy Advance game, this was changed to 999.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
The international version has several changes to levels when compared to the Japanese release. These include minor graphical changes to fix mistakes or to provide more obvious information to the player, along with several changes to make the game slightly easier.
These changes are also present in the Game Boy Advance release.
Contributed by MeleeWaluigi
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The game contains an unused sprite of the word "and", it's not known exactly where this would have appeared, but it was most likely intended to be used as part of the copyright text.
Contributed by MeleeWaluigi
In the SNES release, Yoshi's house has seven berries on it. In the Game Boy Advance release, there are ten berries.
Contributed by Kakariko Kid
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The sleeping fish enemy, known as "Rip Van Fish", will typically chase down Mario upon being woken up. However, if Mario is under the effect of a star power-up, Rip Van Fish will make an effort to flee in the opposite direction of Mario instead.
Contributed by Cybrisk
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The grassy pond located half way up "Kappa Mountain", found near the start of the game on Yoshi's Island, is named after the mythological "Kappa" from Japanese folklore, which is often depicted with a small pool of water on its head. The name "Kappa Mountain" only appears in the game's instruction manual.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
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If you play the last level of the special world in the Japanese version of the game, at the very end of the level a lot of coins will spell out "you are super player". To fix any grammatical issues, the international version changed this to spell out "you are a super player".
Contributed by Ophl
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In the Japanese version, Reznor's name is Bui Bui which is labeled on the wooden planks when you battle them in the fortresses. Bui Bui's name was changed to Reznor when the game was localized.
Contributed by Ophl
The Reznors fought at the end of Fortresses were named after Trent Reznor from the industrial rock band Nine Inch Nails, similar to how the Koopalings were all named after Famous Musicians.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
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In an early prototype of the game, the clouds in the sky are reminiscent of old Japanese art. The world it overlooks is a mushroom shape, which resembles the prototype overworld. It would later appear in the Super Mario Advance version of the game.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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An unused 5-up logo can be found in the game's data. When used in game, the logo doesn't show up correctly. You can get a 5-up by bouncing on Wigglers, or by using a Game Genie code. It's fully coded, but the actual way the graphics are displayed is incorrect, as their properties are pulled from the code after the table with the score palettes. The 8x8 tiles used are incorrectly flipped horizontally and vertically.
Contributed by GamerBen144
The game's ending shows Mario and Luigi with red and green shoes, despite the cover depicting Mario with brown shoes. Also, both Mario and Luigi wear brown shoes during game play.
Contributed by CosmykTheDolfyn
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Early screenshots of the game show that Raccoon Mario was to return, before being replaced by Cape Mario. A raccoon leaf and a few Raccoon Mario sprites are also present among other early Super Mario World graphics found within the data of a SNES test cartridge, used by Nintendo to test and diagnose the consoles and controllers.
Contributed by KidDivinegon
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The stage which is shown at the title screen is an unfinished version of the Special World level "Groovy".
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The Japanese box art of Super Mario World uses the subtitle, "Super Mario Bros. 4". Even though the subtitle isn't used on the Japanese title screen (or anywhere else) there is a graphic for the subtitle in the game's ROM.
Contributed by weegeechan
The game originally had a flying cage carried by four winged creatures. Mario would start already in the cage and with an autoscroll script, the cage would move along the level. Although the cage can be found in the code, the graphics for it are incomplete. The cage is likely left over from the 'SNES Test Program'.
Contributed by Antwan
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Spike Tops originally had six legs when they debuted in Super Mario World.
Contributed by Antwan
The two ammunition-based enemies in Super Mario World are Bullet Bills and Torpedo Teds. This would make their referred-to names 'Bill and Ted', a possible reference to the film "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure". Their Japanese names translate as "Killer" and "Torpedo" respectively, meaning this reference would have been made by the Nintendo of America localization team.
Contributed by error 52
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The symbol that you find at the top of "Special World" is really the Super Famicom logo in Japan, and the SNES logo in Europe.
Contributed by gamemaster1991
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A hidden level is found in the game's code, which seems to be a test level. All unused level sections are filled with this test level, so over 200 copies of this level are in the game.
Contributed by ummwat
If you wait in the special world for a few seconds the music will change to a remix of the original Super Mario Bros theme.
Contributed by claudevandog
The manual reveals that the sunken ghost ship is actually an air ship that was used by the Koopalings in Super Mario Bros. 3.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
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The seemingly random symbol on the mail box of Yoshi's House is actually the logo for Japan's postal service.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
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In the Japanese version, Yoshi can eat the dolphins. This was removed from the international release. It's thought it was removed because of the different cultural views towards dolphins, or simply to make the level easier to finish, as the dolphins can be used as platforms. This was added back into all versions of the Game Boy Advance version.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
In the Japanese games, Super Mario World's "Forest of Illusion" and The Legend of Zelda's "Lost Woods" share the name, "Mayoi no Mori" (Lost Forest). All the standard exits in the Forest of Illusion send you around in circles which is comparable to the Lost Woods circling you back to the entrance after a wrong turn.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming