Super Mario Sunshine
Super Mario Sunshine
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In Episode 6 of Sirena Beach, the US version requires player to clean up about 95% of the goo littering the level in order to complete it. In the Japanese version, the player is required to clean up about 99% of the goo.
Contributed by MeleeWaluigi
In the Japanese version, the name of some levels a different compared to the US version.

• US: Pianta Village - Japan: Monte Village
• US: Gelato Beach - Japan: Mamma Beach
• US: Noki Bay - Japan: Mare Bay
Contributed by MeleeWaluigi
In the Japanese version, when you lose a life the text says "Miss!". In the international versions the text says "Too bad!".
Contributed by MeleeWaluigi
During the development of Super Mario Sunshine, the team planned for a multiplayer mode. One player would play as Mario and the other would play as Shadow Mario. When the players moved away from each other the camera would move out. There was even a function in the game's code to determine if a map belonged to the multiplayer mode of the game, entitled "SMS_isMultiplayerMap".
Contributed by HydroStorm
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There is an unused enemy named "Kug" found in the games files. Although there's no way to access it normally, it can be found under Pinna Park by glitching the camera, or by using a cheat device.
Contributed by Spinjitsuninja
There's an unused sound file of Mario saying "Ciao", which was possibly meant to play when you start up the game.
Contributed by WoopeTon33
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In the Hotel Delfino stage's ventilation shaft, there's a janitor who says "All these ghosts are causing such trouble... They're everywhere! Why can't someone come along and suck 'em up with a vacuum?". This is a nod to another GameCube game, Luigi's Mansion.
Contributed by DashingBob
By using a cheat device, you can access a test room. Certain beta elements are in it. For example, a soccer ball, along with a Hinokuri without its outer shell.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Each location on Isle Delfino contains an Italian word. This is likely in reference to Mario's nationality.
• Delfino Plaza - Dolphin Plaza
• Bianco Hills - White Hills
• Ricco Harbour - Rich Harbour
• Gelato Beach - Ice Cream Beach
• Pianta Village - Plant Village
• Noki Bay - Shell Bay
• Pinna Park - Fin Park
• Sirena Beach - Siren Beach
• Corona Mountain - Crown Mountain
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
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The option to turn off closed captions during cutscenes does not appear in any non-western releases. This is likely due to cutscenes having extensive English voice acting in all versions of the game.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
Within one of the bell towers in Delfino Plaza is a Rocket Nozzle box. The box is inaccessible without the use of a cheat device, and is only visible through the use of camera glitches.
Contributed by Raiden
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The layout of the beach in the Sirena Beach stage strongly resembles the GameCube controller. One of the pools represents the grey analog stick, while the others are the A, B, X and Y buttons. The flame at the center is the START button, and the chairs are where the Nintendo GameCube logo would be. The two cabana huts are positioned to form the D-pad and C analog stick.
Contributed by zybershield
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Early in development, there was going to be an enemy named "Tramplin' Stu", another iteration of Stu in the game. The Tramplin' Stu was supposed to spawn Swoopin' and Strollin' Stu behind it as it walked. To defeat a Tramplin' Stu, you must fill it with water so that the outer shell pops, then you stomp on the eye on top of it. The data for Tramplin' Stu can be found in a test map where it shows up correctly, but without its shell. Tramplin' Stu shows up correctly with its shell when moved to the Delfino plaza map. Trampin' Stu's Japanese name is Hinokuri2 ( ヒノクリ2 ).
F.L.U.U.D. was originally going to have a much thinner nozzle and less bulky body design.
There is unused text in the Japanese version hinting at an unused train system. According to the text, Mario could purchase tickets, get them stamped, and travel to different parts of Isle Delfino, possibly as means of accessing the different levels in the game. Since Pinna Park is one of the listed locations, this implies that either there was a bridge to the island at one point, the train was a subway, or Pinna Park wasn't always located on the tail island of Isle Delfino. Note that the text also hints at three possibly unused areas, named "Battleship Island", "In front of Flame Temple", and "Lighthouse Island".
Contributed by game4brains
Gooper Blooper was originally going to be blue. This was most likely changed to match with the color of regular Bloopers.
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Some have speculated that human NPCs were to be in the game. This is because a human girl can be seen in the Space World 2001 trailer, but only for a fraction of a second.
There is an unused music track in the game of the Noki Bay theme, as if you were riding Yoshi, even though Yoshi is not in Noki Bay. Many have speculated this is because Yoshi was going to be in the level, but was removed.
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The Stu generators in-game were going to be animated.
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There are multiple eerie images in unused pollution maps.
Contributed by peanutgamer
A study in America found that playing Super Mario Sunshine made people more helpful in real life.

They assigned some students to play a video game that the researchers deemed prosocial-either Super Mario Sunshine (pictured above), in which Mario must clean up environmental pollution, or Chibi Robo, where players assume the role of a robot who helps a family manage their house...

...After playing the game, the students were paired with another person and told to make their partner complete 11 puzzles from a selection of 30"”10 of which were hard, 10 easy, and 10 in between. They were informed that if their partner was to solve 10 of the puzzles correctly, then the partner would receive a $10 gift certificate. The researchers deemed a person's behavior as "helpful" if the participant gave his or her partner an easy puzzle, "hurtful" if the puzzle was hard, and "neutral" for medium puzzles.

Their findings were quite dramatic: Those who played the prosocial games were significantly more likely to be helpful, while those who played the violent games were more likely to be hurtful.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
In the Japanese version of this game, during the opening cutscene after Shadow Mario vanishes from Peach's sight, you can faintly hear Mario saying "Look's like Mario's gonna have to find a job," Toadsworth then asks "Are you starting a new career?" And goes back to to their original conversation. Despite being removed from the International versions, it is spoken in clear English.
Contributed by Bean101
In Episode 1: The Road to the Big Windmill, if you skip the Sun Sprite after you defeat the Polluted Piranha Plant and go up the windmill you can battle Petey Piranha. This is the only episode in the entire game that can be skipped. Also, on the way up the windmill a Pianta will say that you are getting ahead of yourself, this is a reference to Super Mario 64 where you can get Power Stars which are not necessarily Mario's current objective.
Contributed by Outofmind23
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One of the more well-known things about Super Mario Sunshine before its U.S. release was the "Shine Get!" phrase shown everytime Mario obtained a Shine. Not surprisingly, this fine example of video game Engrish was changed to simply "Shine!" for the English version.
Contributed by Bean101
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In the beginning of the game, when FLUDD is scanning Mario, there are videos playing in the bottom-left corner of the screen. These videos are Mario fighting Bowser in "Super Mario Bros", Iggy Koopa in "Super Mario World", and Bowser again in "Super Mario 64." In the opposite corner is a list of backwards names which represent past Mario games. Looking closely reveals that both Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64 were written with the word KIRT instead of KART.
Contributed by gamemaster1991
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In Noki Bay, once inside the bottle in the Red Coins in a Bottle level, Mario should fall to the bottom of the bottle and then locate a small rock formation there. If Mario maneuvers into a small square opening towards the back right of the rock formation, he can find a small door inside the opening which is impossible to open. Therefore, the player must rotate the camera to see what is on the other side of the door. In doing so, Mario can see a brown book on the floor of the room behind the impassable door, though its purpose is unknown.

The book itself may be a reference (or vice versa) to the level's background music. In the Original soundtrack, the title of the level's theme is in fact "The Book in the Bottle". It's also been said that this mission was originally different, and that Mario would collect the book rather than 8 red coins.
Contributed by Bean101
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"Isle Delfino" is Italian and literally translates into "Dolphin Island", likely referencing Gamecube's original code name, Project Dolphin (abbreviated as DOL, and can be seen under every Gamecube).
Contributed by Raiden
In the Japanese version of the game, there are files referencing planned train stations and dialogue involved in obtaining and stamping tickets. Each ticket would take you to one of 15 stations.
Contributed by Dvon
In an early prerelease version of Super Mario Sunshine, Delfino Plaza has a different look than in later prerelease versions and the final product.
Contributed by Dvon
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Il Piantissimo is actually The Running Man from Ocarina of Time/The Postman from Majora's Mask.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming