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Baldur's Gate 3
5
Baldur's Gate 3 was originally revealed with a CGI trailer at a conference for the Google Stadia cloud gaming service in June 2019 as part of an Early Access exclusivity deal that would ultimately be cancelled when Stadia was shut down in 2023. The game's director Swen Vincke touted the service at the time for its purported accessibility, and the potential for in-game community feedback to directly affect the game's development and playthroughs via Stadia's Crowd Choice feature. However, Vincke later expressed regret over having the game be revealed this way, calling it "a really stupid deal" due to the challenges of releasing an Early Access build to a second platform, but that "it allowed me to pay for the CGI."
person Rocko & Heffer calendar_month March 29, 2024
Super Mario 64
1
The first-ever footage of Luigi as a playable character in Super Mario 64 was discovered through an old VHS tape in 2023. The footage was captured by a Japanese broadcaster recording footage of Nintendo's 1995 Space World trade show in Japan for a TV program covering the event. Despite this, the footage of Luigi is not actually the primary focus of the clip and as such can barely be seen at all. The video shows Luigi falling back down after performing a spin-jump in what appears to be a red and white test area.
LEGO Island
1
In the E3 1997 demo reel for LEGO Island, an early version of the bad ending is shown, which is significantly longer than the final game's ending scene, showing situations such as a motorcycle breaking down, minifigures losing their heads, an ambulance falling into a river, a minifigure getting their leg bitten by a shark, a homeless minifigure begging for change, and the Information Center experiencing a fire. The final game significantly shortens this to just the Brickster contemplating what he's done in front of the town debris, likely as the original ending was deemed too depressing for small children.
person Rocko & Heffer calendar_month November 25, 2023
Cuphead
2
On August 24, 2017, a video was uploaded by gaming news outlet VentureBeat where lead writer Dean Takahashi, who specializes in general industry articles, strategy games and first/third person shooters and normally does not cover platformers or sidescrolling action games because by the outlet's own admission he was extremely bad at them, recorded a gameplay demonstration of him playing the Gamescom 2017 demo for Cuphead due to him being the only one on staff at Gamescom. This footage is notorious for the first two and a half minutes where he struggles to complete the game's tutorial, before struggling to play for another 23 minutes under conditions that were made intentionally easier for the game's demo such as increased health and instant access to some stronger unlockable charms like Spread. VentureBeat knew the footage was bad, but uploaded it anyways and drew attention to Takahashi's poor gameplay in the video title, calling it "shameful". However, VentureBeat initially did not explain the full context of the footage in the video description, and due to Gamescom being held one month prior to Cuphead's release, the clip was passed around out of context leading people to believe he was doing a full review of the game and trying to make a point of it being too difficult. In reality, the video was posted alongside an article about the demo by Takahashi to VentureBeat that regularly acknowledges his poor skill at the game; he also called Cuphead a fun game that showed "why making hard games that depend on skill is like a lost art". Regardless, the footage still drew extreme negative backlash and harassment towards him and claims that he was unfit to be a game journalist. Takahashi's response to the controversy spurred more controversy after he accused people attacking the footage of being connected to the 2014 #Gamergate movement, when one week prior to responding, he published an article promoting the idea of a "leisure economy" that stems from game journalists among others being paid to play games, and promoting the fact that he had been reviewing games for 21 years up to that point.
person Kirby Inhales Jotaro calendar_month November 23, 2023
Company: Atari SA
subdirectory_arrow_right Infogrames Entertainment SA (Company)
4
Attachment In 2001, Infogrames Entertainment SA produced a corporate anthem entitled "Infogrames Rocks My World", which was used at industry events starting with E3 2001 as part of a heavy marketing push to promote their slate of IPs after a series of acquisitions throughout the 1990s. According to YouTuber Larry Bundy Jr. during a video researching the development and release controversies surrounding the game Driv3r, Infogrames' public relations division reportedly spent $50,000 creating the song, but due to the song being relentlessly mocked following its reveal, everyone involved with the song's production was reportedly fired. While Bundy also claimed that the song was first leaked to the Internet by a disgruntled Driv3r developer in 2004, the song was actually distributed by Infogrames to other gaming news outlets as part of digital press kits. The earliest known upload of the song appears to be by software developer Phil Bak to his personal website sometime during or immediately after E3 2001 in May, and the earliest known surviving upload is through a 2001 IGN article covering Infogrames' Gamers' Day press event in August. The song was later uploaded to ZDNET in 2002 on a special article ranking it at #9 on a list of their Top 20 Corporate IT Anthems.
person MehDeletingLater calendar_month November 21, 2023
Infogrames Entertainment SA's PR department - "Infogrames Rocks My World":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEQOv2g0JA#t=1041

Larry Bundy Jr. video on Driv3r development and release controversies:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEQOv2g0JA

3000 AD forum post of the Phil Bak link to the song days after E3 2001:
https://www.3000ad.com/forum/topic/7001147-infogrames-e3-theme-song/

2001 IGN article and embedded link to the song:
https://www.ign.com/articles/2001/08/08/infogrames-state-of-the-union-at-gamers-day
https://pcmedia.ign.com/media/news/sound/infogrames.mp3

2002 ZDNET Top 20 IT Anthems archived article:
https://web.archive.org/web/20021004141104/http://www.zdnet.co.uk/specials/2002/it-anthems/
The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
subdirectory_arrow_right Pac-Man Vs. (Game), The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (Game)
1
Attachment A popular image macro known as "Gaijin 4koma" (JP: "4-frame foreigners"), depicting a group of fans reacting with indifference to something and then excitement, used to compare the meme editor's and/or popular opinions on two particular subjects, consists of two photos taken by IGN of their reporters during Nintendo E3 presentations in the early 2000s. The excited photo being towards the announcement of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess in 2004, while the indifferent photo was taken during the announcement of Pac-Man Vs. in 2003.
Sonic R
1
When Sonic R was first shown off at E3, many players gave up after running Sonic into the water and discovering how low his speed becomes - the first change game designer Jon Burton made to the game after that showing was increasing the speed velocity in the water.
Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne
subdirectory_arrow_right Max Payne (Game)
1
In Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne, during Part III: Chapter Three: A Mob War, you can find a hidden dialogue between two Punchinello mobsters while they stand guard by a staircase waiting for intruders:

Vegas: "What about moving?"

Unnamed Punchinello mobster: "What about it? Put one foot in front of the other."

Vegas: "No, I mean, what about you moving out, leaving her?"

Unnamed Punchinello mobster: "That's the trouble, you can't choose who you go crazy about."

Vegas: "True, but what you can choose is what you do about it, you know? Kiss them or kill them."

Unnamed Punchinello mobster: "Yeah, I guess you're right. Hey, thanks, Vegas."

Vegas: "Hey, don't get soft on me. You stay here, I'm gonna check upstairs."

Unnamed Punchinello mobster: "Okay. Hey, but Vegas, I really mean it, thanks."

Vegas: "Forget about it already."

This line is a reference to an old meme from the 3D Realms forums. The exact origins of this meme are not entirely known, but in a developer Q&A that occurred at an unknown date (either for the first Max Payne game, or in the lead-up to Max Payne 2's announcement at E3 2002 going off of what could be easily found in 3D Realms' forum archives), one fan asked them "What about moving?", a seemingly vague and unnecessary question. This question perplexed the game's fan community and developers, who promised that moving would appear in the final game, and it did. The question subsequently became an early popular meme on the forums, later being referenced in Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne. In a thread on October 8th, six days prior to the game's release, in anticipation for another developer Q&A, the line as it appears in the game appeared to be referenced in a post presumably by a Remedy Entertainment staff member or moderator, who quoted the first two lines in the dialogue.
person MehDeletingLater calendar_month November 12, 2023
Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne - What About Moving? line:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fVFeuyrVUY

Max Payne 2 announcement thread containing developer Q&A reference:
https://forums.3drealms.com/vb/archive/index.php/t-341.html

Reference to the Easter egg version of the line days before Max Payne 2's release:
https://forums.3drealms.com/vb/archive/index.php/t-6002.html

Favorite quotes thread in which this Easter egg is mentioned:
https://forums.3drealms.com/vb/archive/index.php/t-7045.html
Pepsi Invaders
2
Pepsi Invaders was made for Coca-Cola's 1983 sales convention with the purpose of boosting the morale of employees - despite this, most copies that were given away were thrown out.
Super Smash Bros. Melee
subdirectory_arrow_right Pokémon Channel (Game), Pokémon (Franchise), Super Smash Bros. (Franchise), Nintendo GameCube (Platform)
6
Attachment The trophy representing Meowth in Super Smash Bros. Melee is a reference to his appearance in a tech demo shown off at Spaceworld 2000 called "Meowth's Party", which itself was based on a recurring ending musical number from the Pokémon anime. In his trophy he is holding the same red guitar that he performs with in the tech demo. The flavor text for his trophy even directly mentions this tech demo:

"This...is Meowth's dream. Meowth strides all over the globe, scattering invitations to other Pokémon, insisting they come to "Meowth's Party." At this wonderful party, guests are packed in like sardines as Meowth climbs up the stage with its faithful guitar. It strikes a chord, pauses, and then rocks their world!"

A version of Meowth's Party eventually made its way into the GameCube release of Pokémon Channel.
person Wolfen50 calendar_month September 6, 2023
Spaceworld 2000 Meowth's Party tech demo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62O2vFfS_Ok?t=1387

Pokémon Channel Meowth's Party:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DcqH7Cl9MY

Meowth Trophy image:
https://www.ssbwiki.com/File:Meowth_Trophy_Melee.png

Original Pokémon anime short:
https://vimeo.com/267748188