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Kien
2
Kien was originally developed between 2002 and 2004 by AgeOfGames, a group of five Italian developers who had no prior experience making video games, aiming to be the first company in their country to develop a game for the Game Boy Advance. The game's release would end up being cancelled three separate times when multiple publishers picked up the game and then decided that releasing it would be too risky for sales. At the time, the game was completed and sent to gaming publications, with one known review appearing in the American magazine Nintendo Power in 2003. The game remained unreleased for over 20 years, but a prototype ROM of the game did leak online at one point. Game designer Fabio Belsanti would be the only member of the game's original development team to remain at AgeOfGames, who had shifted to developing educational games to stay afloat. Eventually, with the rising popularity in retro games and lowered cost to produce GBA cartridges, AgeOfGames was able to release Kien in 2024 both digitally and on physical cartridges through retro game publisher Incube8 Games. The game's release garnered attention for it possibly having taken the record for the longest delayed video game release in history, surpassing Duke Nukem Forever and Beyond Good & Evil 2 by taking 22 years to release.
person MehDeletingLater calendar_month July 6, 2024
Mario Party: Fushigi no Challenge World
1
Although it was only released in Japan, there were plans for an international version of Mario Party: Challenge World slated for release in Spring 2018. A demo for an English-translated version was shown off at the 2017 Attractions Expo for the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA) using the Japanese version's six-player roulette design. However, this release date came and went with no further announcements. On May 30, 2018, the game's manufacturer Raw Thrills accidentally uploaded and quickly delisted a video on their YouTube channel showing the international version's boot-up process (using a Windows OS) with the game's title screen fully translated into English, before crashing. In October, photos were leaked to the arcade news blog Arcade Heroes revealing that the international version was still being tested, but sported a heavily revamped cabinet design that ditched the roulette and redesigned the game for only three players. This was most likely due to its original design as a roulette gambling game keeping it from being sold to most American arcades. After more radio silence and it missing IAAPA's 2018 Expo, Raw Thrills confirmed to Arcade Heroes in April 2019 that the game was cancelled, and its few prototype cabinets were sold off to select luxury entertainment centers. One confirmed location housing it as of April 2019 was the Tulsa, Oklahoma branch of Cinergy Entertainment.
person GamerBen144 calendar_month July 4, 2024
Hotel Mario
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Attachment In the prototype of Hotel Mario, walking Toads are used as Super Mushrooms and 1-Up collectables. The final game changes these Toad sprites to bouncing mushrooms, but the manual still refers to them as Toads.
person Rocko & Heffer calendar_month June 19, 2024
Galaga
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Galaga was originally conceived as a way to utilize Galaxian's PCB boards after they were overmanufactured, but while creating a partially-complete prototype, R&D engineer (and future Namco president) Shigeichi Ishimura decided that Galaga should use its own unique PCB hardware.
Discworld
subdirectory_arrow_right Psychosis (Game), Llamatron: 2112 (Game), Explosive Fighter Patton (Game), Slider (Game), The Orion Conspiracy (Game)
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3
person Rocko & Heffer calendar_month April 11, 2024
Company: Cyberdreams
1
"Reverence" was one of the last announced projects by Cyberdreams, but never made it past the Alpha phase before the company's closure. The game saw the player being chosen by the gods themselves to help determine the future of the human race, whom the gods believed to have grown too apathetic and unjust to live. It was intended to be a first-person shooter game, with the player wielding a variety of guns and spells as they traveled through four different realms to decide the fate of humanity. Each realm was modelled after a real life mythological god, those being Osiris (Egyptian god of the underworld), Kokyangwuti (Hopi goddess of life), Freyja (Norse goddess of love), and Manjursi (Tibetan god of wisdom). While the game itself was cancelled, a playable prototype was leaked in 2015.
person chocolatejr9 calendar_month March 14, 2024
DanceDanceRevolution
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In August 2015, location tests for DanceDanceRevolution (2014) were held in North America. This marked both the first time the series was location tested in North America since Dance Dance Revolution X2 and the first time eAMUSEMENT was officially supported in the region. The English translation was a more completed version of the one present in the Korean version. Furthermore, 47 songs were removed from this version due to copyright restrictions, mostly being licensed songs from previous entries and all the "U.M.UXBEMANI" songs.

In the end, DanceDanceRevolution (2014) was not released in North America, with the following game Dance Dance Revolution A becoming the first Arcade release in North America since Dance Dance Revolution X2.
person aa1205 calendar_month March 8, 2024
Barkley: Shut Up and Jam 2
1
Attachment A prototype for Barkley: Shut Up & Jam 2 shows that, instead of the photo used in the final game, the title screen was going to show a cartoon illustration of Charles Barkley.
Resistance: Fall of Man
subdirectory_arrow_right Resistance (Franchise)
1
During the 2006 Game Developers Conference (GDC) where Sony Computer Entertainment showcased a new demo for Resistance, the game previously known as "I-8". The demo showed the game in a much more complete form than the simple FPS that was shown at E3 2005. The gameplay was shown with new weapons very much like the Ratchet & Clank series, only now with a more realistic slant. The demo also showed off effects such as smoke trails on grenades, tactical troop movements, and enemies that came from the ceilings as the lead character ran down a devastated corridor.
Star Fox
subdirectory_arrow_right Starglider (Collection)
2
Argonaut Software's Starglider games released in the 1980s, which were first-person combat flight simulators rendered with wireframe vector graphics, inspired them to come up with a prototype that would eventually lead to the creation of the first Star Fox. They created a prototype for the Nintendo Entertainment System codenamed as "NESGlider" that was based on the original game, utilizing a similar method to accelerate graphics to how the Super FX chip for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System later would. When they showed this prototype to Nintendo in 1990, they were instead advised to port and develop the game for the then-upcoming SNES. After Argonauts did that, Nintendo declared that this was the best 3D graphics the console could produce and that they hadn't designed the SNES with 3D games in mind. Argonaut staff suggested that if they wanted better, then they should let them design a 3D chip for them, and thus the Super FX chip was born.
Star Fox 64
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Star Fox 64's development began with a series of experiments by character designer Takaya Imamura and programmer Kazuaki Morita. As Morita was new to 3D programming, creating something entirely new was difficult, and to make matters worse, they didn't have the final N64 hardware itself to work with, instead having to utilize a bulky dev computer and a modified SNES controller. The pair decided to begin development by porting the original Star Fox, which they thought would be better for easing into 3D. As this was Morita's first attempt at learning 3D, he began with inputting his own data and placing objects like cubes on a course, and then launched basic-looking Arwings. This prototype was affectionately named "Star Box".
person Dinoman96 calendar_month January 28, 2024
User's translation of Star Fox 64 developer interview from official Japanese guidebook:
https://www.reddit.com/r/starfox/comments/x938ib/behold_an_attempt_at_translating_an_interview/

Nintendo Dream Star Fox Adventures interview:
https://shmuplations.com/starfoxadventures/

General SF64 development timeline overview:
https://tcrf.net/Prerelease:Star_Fox_64
Color a Dinosaur
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Attachment A prototype for Color a Dinosaur shows that the game was originally called Paint Me! and used black backgrounds instead of white. Despite the title not signifying that the game features dinosaurs, there is nothing to suggest that the game was ever going to feature any pages other than dinosaurs, as all the pages on the prototype are also dinosaurs.
Bust-A-Move
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Attachment A prototype exists for a US version of the original Japan-exclusive Puzzle Bobble known as Bubble Buster which removes the Bubble Bobble elements outright, as it was a very common practice for puzzle games at the time. This is somewhat unusual, because no replacement characters were provided, unlike localisations such as Tetris Attack, and Bubble Bobble had already proven itself to be a popular brand in the American market at the time. The logo for Bubble Buster would serve as the basis for the logo of the Neo Geo arcade remake's US release, Bust-A-Move, though that did not remove the Bubble Bobble characters.
Virtual Bart
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Attachment The prototype for Virtual Bart shows an ending screen at the end of the credits instead of just the player's score. It is a crudely written "THE END" in cursive with the nonsensical text "You are a true Bart Simpson" alongside the score. The "You are a true Bart Simpson" text is in the final game's code.
Virtual Bart
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Attachment In a prototype for Virtual Bart, an early version of the cutscene that plays before the tomato-throwing minigame can be seen. This cutscene shows Bart with a devious smirk, which was likely redrawn for going against Simpsons style guide rules against "demonic expressions"
Batman
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2
South Park: Chef's Luv Shack
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South Park: Chef's Luv Shack has an unused minigame called WBALL, where the boys would throw water balloons at passerby from a tall building. It exists in the PlayStation version and a prototype of the Dreamcast version, but it is not currently known to be playable.
Super Donkey
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While Super Donkey is thought to have ultimately evolved into Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island, the project was likely tossed around as a Mario or Zelda game at various points in development.

Various development assets associated with Super Donkey, which were uncovered alongside the prototype in the 2020 Gigaleak, include sprites and animations for Link, Mario, and Donkey Kong; the animation files for Link are dated to fall 1990, while Mario's animation files are dated to winter of that year. Additional files for all three characters span overlapping periods in 1991. Link's sprites and animations indicate that Super Donkey was at one point planned to be a side-scrolling Zelda title similar to Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, while Mario's animations imply that the iteration that starred him and Donkey Kong eventually morphed into the 1994 Game Boy title Donkey Kong.
Collection: pop'n music
subdirectory_arrow_right jubeat (Collection)
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In JAEPO 2020, Konami unveiled two new rhythm arcade titles that were never released:

• "NEW pop'n music Welcome to Wonderland!" was created as a reboot to the long standing "pop'n music" series. The game used a different arcade cabinet with smaller buttons and a touch panel meant for new slide notes. Aesthetically, the game also utilized 3D models for the characters as opposed to 2D sprites. Both licensed songs exclusive to this cabinet, "Phantom Joke" and "少年よ我に帰れ", were added to "pop'n music peace" on August 3rd, 2020.

• "jubeat (2020)" was also meant to be a reboot, this time to the identically-named "jubeat" series. Unlike "Welcome to Wonderland", the gameplay remained identical between it and previous entries. The arcade cabinet itself was roughly 1.2X the size of previous iterations and ran at 60 fps, as opposed to 30fps. The cabinets also supported music videos and would have come in several colors. In 2021, a mobile version of jubeat released utilizing similar aesthetics to this cancelled version. 2022 saw the release of a new iteration, "jubeat Ave.", which utilized the previous arcade technology.
person aa1205 calendar_month January 3, 2024
RemyWiki page on cancelled BEMANI titles:
https://remywiki.com/Cancelled_Games#jubeat_(2020)
https://remywiki.com/Cancelled_Games#NEW_pop'n_music_Welcome_to_Wonderland!

RemyWiki page on NEW pop'n music Welcome to Wonderland!:
https://remywiki.com/AC_NEW_pnm

Gameplay of Welcome to Wonderland:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbVlUpMS71I

RemyWiki page on jubeat (2020):
https://remywiki.com/AC_jb_2020

Footage of jubeat (2020):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1sl8C338Fs
Rex Ronan: Experimental Surgeon
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There were two evaluations held in which children less than 12 years old played a prototype version of the game. Based on the results, children who enjoyed playing the game were more likely to gain an interest in acquiring information on tobacco and its effects on people.
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