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Series: Shining
In an 'Shining Force Encyclopedia' interview with game's Producer/Designer Hiroyuki Takahashi, he was asked how his team came up with the Japanese title "Shining Force: The Legacy of the Gods". Takahashi stated: "We had a few different candidates for titles. The one we chose was suggested by the scenario writer. Originally, the title was simply 'Kamigami no Isan' ('Legacy of the Gods'). I’m something of a sci-fi diehard, and I read a bunch of sci-fi novels that had similar-sounding titles, like “the ___ of the ___”, so that’s why we settled on this one."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Series: Fatal Fury
According to the SNK team in an Neo Geo Freak Magazine interview, 'Hon Fu' was originally going to be a legendary karate master, but the team wanted him to use nunchuks, so they decided to use Chinese martial arts (Kung-Fu) for him instead.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Fatal Fury 3: Road to the Final Victory
In a Neo Geo Freak Magazine interview, the SNK team originally wanted to replace 'Mai Shiranui' with a new female character named 'Alice Chrysler', but they gave in to fan demands and brought back Mai.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Secret of Mana
According to game's director and chief designer Koichi Ishii in an Hippon Super magazines interview, his team wanted to add traps in the chests to trick the players so they thought twice before opening them. This idea came from Wizardry series.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Series: Wario
In an interview, the game's director and designer Hiroji Kiyotake was asked what the idea behind Wario's creation was. He responded: "We imagined Wario as the Bluto to Mario’s Popeye. The truth is, we kind of came up with the idea of the name first, and everything else came after. Since he was a “warui” (bad) guy, he should be Wario. And we had the idea to flip the M upside down. To our surprise, the idea was a big hit with everyone on the team."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins
In an interview, the game's director and designer Hiroji Kiyotake was asked about the characters and sprites looking different from other Mario games. He responded: "With Super Mario Land 2, one of our ideas was to not be bound by the conventions of the previous games. However, when we showed our first draft to everyone, they were like, “I don’t know… is this Mario?” We realized we were on the wrong path, so we toned down that idea and made something a little closer to the existing Mario world."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Star Ocean: Blue Sphere
In an interview with game's design Tetsu Takayashiki, he was asked why the team chose to develop for the Game Boy Color instead of more powerful hardware. He responded: "After Star Ocean and Star Ocean 2nd Story, it was decided that we would make Star Ocean 3 for the PS2. The question then became how to fill in the gap while we waited for that project to begin. From the beginning, our plans were to make a compact game."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Ghouls 'n Ghosts
In an interview with game's designer Tokurou Fujiwara, he was asked how the developers began making the game. He responded: "I’ve been wanting to make this game for a very long time. Then when the CP System PCBs came out, it felt like the timing was finally right. The CPS boards have a lot of memory, but the plans we drew up for Daimakaimura called for a game even larger than that. There was so much stuff in there—twice as much as what’s been added to the game right now. Even when it’s completed, I think it will only be about half of what we originally planned. And still, compared with the original Makaimura it’s a massive increase in content."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The reason for the game being set during World War 1 was the result of DICE producer Alexs Grondal wanting to bring a brand new experience to the series. Grondal said the team had been thinking of this idea for about a decade, since a lot of the games in the series had been focusing on the “modern era.” The game taking place during World War 1 was also the reason why it was called “Battlefield 1.” The team thought that World War 1 was “the genesis of modern warfare.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee
In The PlayStation (JP) Magazine interview, the game's director Lorne Lanning was asked where the idea for the GameSpeak action system came from. He responded: "The GameSpeak interactions came from us trying to figure out what kind of actions or movements Abe could have that would be funny, humorous, or kind of suggest to players that he was this weird guy, in a light-hearted way. How could we make players feel more intimately connected with the world and characters? GameSpeak was our answer to that. When players see other characters talking with Abe and interacting with him, it provokes a feeling of cuteness and affection for those characters, and the player then empathizes more closely with what’s happening on-screen. It helps bring them to life as characters, you could say."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Streets of Rage 2
In the Marukatsu Megadrive interview, the game's composer Yuzo Koshiro was asked about what music influenced the game. He responded: "I started writing the music last Spring, which was right around the time The Orb was coming to Japan, and everyone (myself included) was super excited about that. I was listening to Prodigy and Eon too, stuff with weird lyrics."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Virtua Fighter
Akira Yuki was modeled after real-life martial artist Masaaki Satake. His choice of fighting style, Bajiquan (Hakkyouken), was inspired by the main martial art from the Kenji manga. According to an interview with the series creator Seiichi Ishii, the game was heavily influenced by the manga, to the point that one of the game's preliminary titles was Virtua Fighter Hakkyouken.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
Virtua Fighter
The initial idea behind the game wasn't a fighting game. According to series creator Yu Suzuki, after finding ways to have human polygonal models in Virtua Racing, they looked into making a sports game. However, due to technical limitations they could not animate a full sports team and settled for a game that only required two characters onscreen.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
Boo was almost going to be a scrapped character sometime during development. Nintendo didn’t feel like Boo holding a tennis racquet in his hand was going to fit. However, Boo was kept in the game because, according to Famitsu, “they wanted to make a game that’s both a Mario game and a tennis game at the same time.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
The game's developers wanted Makoto's moves to be based on 'Ikken Hissatsu': simple, direct, and powerful. They wanted her karate moves to have a more Japanese style, rather than Ryu & Ken's American style of Karate.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Series: Metroid
Sega's Toshihiro Nagoshi revealed in an interview, where he talked about F-Zero GX, that Sega had also pitched a Metroid game to Nintendo. However, Nintendo had obviously turned down Sega's pitch.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Okami
In an interview, Hideki Kamiya said he discussed putting "Dante" from the Devil May Cry series in the game.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Okami
In an interview, Hideki Kamiya admitted that early in the development, the team wanted to use the power slash move on the torii gates. However, the team removed the idea, as they all thought to themselves “should a goddess really be doing that?”
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Castlevania: Symphony of the Night
The development team's first idea for the game was to use the story and setting of Vampire Killer, and make the final Belmont vampire hunter the enemy. Another idea was to make Quincy Morris the person who defeated Dracula. They were also ordered by the "section chief" to make the “Ultimate Dracula” game. No one really knew what “ultimate” meant, but all the developers had talked it over, and the result was Symphony of the Night.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
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A city named "Sutch" was cut from the final game. The only remnants are the existence of a "Fort Sutch" in the final game. Sutch is mentioned in lore throughout the series, and the E3 2005 demo of Oblivion featured Sutch on the world map.
Contributed by ClaudX
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