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Castlevania: Symphony of the Night
The Sega Saturn version of the game contains hidden files that can only be accessed when loading the game disc on a PC. 15 pieces of character artwork and a text document containing messages from 13 of the Saturn version's developers including graphic artists, members of the sound team, and programmers can be found. The messages contain insights about their duties, goals and struggles in porting the game from the PlayStation to the inferior Saturn, with several members of the staff having just entered the video game industry and joined Konami prior to work starting on the port, and collectively having mixed to positive feelings about the final result, with most being happy with their work, while others feeling they had failed to live up to the PlayStation version. Regardless, much of the staff thanked players for playing the game and encouraged them to mail feedback to them at Konami.

Two notable details from these messages include:

•A story/rant shared by programmer Hideto Imai in the last and longest message about his experience in violating Japan's Motor Vehicle Storage Act by parking his car curbside while staying at his in-laws during development.

•A scrapped character idea shared by graphic designer Yoshinori Suzuki:

"There's actually another version of Maria with a full set of graphics different from the one the player meets in the actual game. It ended up going unused. It might've been neat if she had been used, though. Because she was a dark version of Maria, the opposite to the light version of Maria, her attacks and such would have been entirely different. Go ahead and imagine for yourselves what she might have been like. (Perhaps, if she'd appeared in the game, she'd have been called Black Maria?)"
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tornado Outbreak
The location for Ringling Village is loosely based off of Wiltshire, a country from South West England.
Contributed by Larrye
Attachment
Pikachu and Pichu's Neutral Special, Thunder Jolt, is actually a move taken from and exclusive to the Pokémon Trading Card Game, specifically the Pikachu Card from the very first Base Set. This is true for both the English and Japanese versions of the move, as the same exact name in both languages is used from the card (Thunder Jolt and "Electricity Attack" respectively). This makes Thunder Jolt the only adapted Pokémon Special Move to be directly taken from the TCG, instead of the games or anime.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Grand Theft Auto 2
One of the game's composers Colin Anderson, a life-long fan of progressive rock, had originally planned to include a prog rock radio station called "Ridiculous FM" that played "Regressive Rock", the joke being that it would play a single multi-part prog suite that was longer than any of the other stations in the game on an endless loop. Although this idea was cut from the game due to time constraints and the team feeling it was inappropriate for the game's setting, Anderson would regularly think about what the song would have been like until 2015, when he completed it with the help of several consultants and recorded it with the aid of vocalists and a live drummer. The final product, a 20 minute 16-part song called "YTZ", was released under the name Aori, a duo with Anderson and singer/lyricist Neil Horsburgh. "Aori" was previously the title of a song also written and released by Anderson under the name Ashtar that was featured on the Radio '76 FM station in Grand Theft Auto. Additionally, the song title "YTZ" is a reference to the instrumental "YYZ" by the prog band Rush; both names are airport identification codes used by airports in Toronto, Canada, and both songs feature Morse code messages spelling their respective song titles.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
In an interview with the game's Cave devgroup leader and Toaplan alumni Toshiaki Tomizawa published in the 2002 GSLA and likely featured in Arcadia, Tomizawa stated that the game is actually a orthodox shoot 'em up. Whereas Dodonpachi Daioujou's design has more futuristic looks, with Ketsui the team wanted the game to be a little more realistic and similar to the modern world. The team wanted to emphasize the aspects that would attract to a wider base of casual gamers, so they made the game's world somewhat more recognizable, and be quicker and easier to understand. Additionally, one of the core themes for the game's design was "steel". Since standard modern weaponry was being used, they wanted that to be realistic as well.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In an interview with the game's designer Hitoshi Sasaki published in the 1996 Dengeki SFC magazine, he stated that the idea of making a game where you raised dragons and fought together with them was what inspired the development team to make this game.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Series: Uncharted
According to actor Tom Holland during an interview with YouTuber JackSepticEye, the film makers originally wanted to include the car chase scene from Uncharted 4: A Thief's End into the Uncharted movie, but the idea was scrapped due to time constraints.
Contributed by Tuli0hWut
Michael Booth, the game’s creator, envisioned Nox as an updated version of the 1985 Atari game Gauntlet. He also looked at real-time magical combat games such as "Magic: The Gathering" and Mortal Kombat, hence the medical setting for Nox.
Contributed by GamerBen144
"Deliver Us the Moon" was inspired by the Deetman brothers' grandfather, who had an immense passion for astronomy. The duo also looked to science-fiction movies such as "2001: A Space Odyssey" and "Interstellar".
Contributed by GamerBen144
Tomb Raider: The Last Revelation
This game was supposed to be the last in the franchise with Lara seemingly dying by falling to her death at the end. In Andy Sandham's own words; "we attempted to kill Lara off because we really thought we'd exhausted what we could do with the franchise. Seeing Lara falling down a gigantic hole in the middle of the pyramid was quite a joyous moment. So, we went for a few pints to celebrate her death."
Contributed by raidramon0
According to Genki in an interview with Gamers Republic magazine, the game's hard difficulty was an intentional decision by the developers. They did not include any notes within the game that told the player what to do; instead, they aimed to communicate with the difficulty of the game by having the player refer to the body movements of the lead character Neo to decide how to progress.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Super Smash Bros.
Mario and his Special Moves in this game are based off of the "Shoto" style of Fighting Game characters, most specifically the character Ryu from Street Fighter. For example, like Ryu, Mario has a Hadoken-like "fireball" attack with his Neutral Special (Fireball), A punching uppercut similar to the Shoryuken via his Up Special (Super Jump Punch), and a spinning tackle akin to Ryu's Tatsumaki Senpukyaku in the form of his Down Special (Mario Tornado). However, while Mario's moveset would change in later games to be less Shoto-esque, Ryu himself would be added into the Smash series and make his debut as a fighter in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Dying Light
Techland took inspiration from novels such as Albert Camus' "The Plague" and Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" for the game's story in order to "evoke similar emotions" and show how people can react to extreme situations.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Doom
The game began development as a tie-in game based on the Alien franchise. However, because id Software wanted total creative control, negotiations with 20th Century Fox fell through. Instead, they took influences from the movie, as well as the Evil Dead franchise for the Chainsaw and Shotgun weapons, and dropped the use of aliens in favor of a "demons from Hell on Mars" theme.
Contributed by raidramon0
Demon's Souls
In a 2010 Eurogamer interview, the game's director Hidetaka Miyazaki revealed that the game's Black and Blue Phantom multiplayer elements were inspired by his experience of driving on a hillside after some heavy snow:

"The origin of that idea is actually due to a personal experience where a car suddenly stopped on a hillside after some heavy snow and started to slip... The car following me also got stuck, and then the one behind it spontaneously bumped into it and started pushing it up the hill... That's it! That's how everyone can get home! Then it was my turn and everyone started pushing my car up the hill, and I managed to get home safely.

But I couldn't stop the car to say thanks to the people who gave me a shove. I'd have just got stuck again if I'd stopped. On the way back home I wondered whether the last person in the line had made it home, and thought that I would probably never meet the people who had helped me. I thought that maybe if we'd met in another place we'd become friends, or maybe we'd just fight...

You could probably call it a connection of mutual assistance between transient people. Oddly, that incident will probably linger in my heart for a long time. Simply because it's fleeting, I think it stays with you a lot longer... like the cherry blossoms we Japanese love so much."
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire
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The games' most prominent subplot focuses on the conflict between Team Aqua and Team Magma in their efforts to gain control of the legendary Pokémon Kyogre and Groudon to change the climate in response to the effect of humans on the environment in order to create expanded environments for sea and land Pokémon respectively. This subplot may (although it has not been confirmed by the developers) have drawn direct inspiration from a real life controversy that was a prominent issue in Japan at the time of the games' development and continues to be. The Isahaya Bay land reclamation project on the Japanese island of Kyūshū, which the Hoenn region is based on, aimed to expand the available farmland in one of Japan's last wetland habitats. This lead to fierce political conflict from environmentalists who argued that the project would cause long-term damage to the wetlands and the marine ecosystem of the area through agricultural runoff released into the sea, and from reclamation activists who argued that Kyūshū needed the land as Japan has very little arable land already and needs to produce enough food to feed its increasing population and keep up with rapid industrialization. The concept of Team Aqua and Team Magma draw striking parallels to each side of this issue (i.e. reclaiming land where there used to be sea and protesting to reclaim sea where there is now land) while being written as cultic villains akin to Team Rocket from past games without distinct arguments to their positions, causing these parallels to be obscured and emphasizing the personal gain of expanding or reducing land for the sake of certain land or sea Pokémon to be won out from the conflict with little to no regard for humanity.

In Pokémon Emerald, the unified story featuring Kyogre and Groudon both being pacified by the presence of Rayquaza, a Pokémon heralding from the sky which in many religions and mythologies is where powerful gods and deities live, hints that a divine compromise between civilization and nature is the necessary solution, with how Hoenn is presented in the final game through the coexistence of different environments, humans and Pokémon being the result. This suggests that the preservation of Isahaya Bay while allowing for land reclamation elsewhere is the compromise this subplot is trying to get across.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
The Walking Dead: Season One
According to The Walking Dead's co-creator and writer Robert Kirkman, he became interested in making a game based on the comic after playing Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People. Sometime later, Telltale Games would successfully pitch their idea of a Walking Dead game to him:

"I played their Strong Bad game. I like their approach to puzzle-based storytelling. I thought they were more focused on telling a good story, and I thought they were good at engaging the player in the narrative. That's what interested me in making a Walking Dead game. They came to me with a proposal that involved decision-making and consequences rather than ammunition gathering or jumping over things; I was impressed by that. The only thing that's really special about The Walking Dead is the human characters and the narrative that they exist in. It's all about drama and loss, so I felt like doing a game with that focus, but that wasn't something that I knew was really possible. When Telltale came and told me about the way that making decisions changed the game and the way that players would be forced to choose between two bad decisions and how the survival aspect of The Walking Dead would actually be brought to the forefront – that's when I was sold on the game."
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Fallout
If you let the Master's Army destroy Necropolis, a ghoul refugee who survived the invasion can be found hiding behind a bookcase with dialogue talking about the invasion, while also mentioning that the attacking super mutants had "some steam trucks". These steam trucks are the only working mechanically propelled vehicles mentioned in the game, and are only mentioned in this Fallout game.

In the eighth installment of the Fallout Bible, Fallout 2 developer Chris Avellone revealed that steam trucks were planned for Fallout, but they were only mentioned in passing for "art reasons and gameplay reasons" and that it may have been an "ugly-looking vehicle".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Rare Replay
GoldenEye 007 was originally planned to be included in the collection, even going so far as having a "Rare Revealed" video focused on the making of the game produced for it, but was scrapped due to licensing issues. This video would later be leaked online in 2019 by a former Rare employee.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Rage of the Dragons
The game was originally developed as sequel to the Double Dragon fighting game on the Neo Geo, however because of "different reasons" the game was turned into its own IP, becoming a tribute to Double Dragon instead of an official game in the series.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
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