In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated in the description for "Under the Stars" that he figures “‘I should write a normal song’, but when I do, oh my!” He also commented that the frequency range on the song’s instrumentation was “a little overstuffed”.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that when his older brother Sakimoto heard the "Night Attack" theme, he said to Iwata that the theme sounded like it was done by a foreigner trying to write something that sounds "Japanese". Iwata took it as a harsh comment, but agreed with him, admitting that he was too influenced by playing a lot of Western games at the time. He really wanted the atmosphere to feel like a night raid, but the latter half of the song "sounds like all the soldiers are dancing around or something".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the "Decisive Battle" felt out of step with the game's historical period. He felt it was more like "a muscle-bound action hero wielding a gatling gun in one hand", instead of wielding sword and sorcery, and apologized if it sounded a little phoned in, adding "I'd do it differently now".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he joked that he wrote "Bloody Excrement" while he was thinking about the game's protagonist, Mr. Forest Bear, a "pleasant, heartwarming tale of Mr. Bear’s family adventure, that's really never explained", and that his original idea for the song was to make it feel like a pleasant, heartwarming story of Mr. Bear’s family adventure.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that he'd tried to evoke "the feeling that you were fighting in the midst of mother nature all around you" for "A Chapel".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that the "Random Waltz" theme was his very first battle theme he wrote, and it served as something like a test for different sampling techniques he wanted to experiment with, which he found very memorable. He also stated that, at the time of this interview, when he thought back on when he wrote the theme, it felt like it was 5 years ago, but it was actually only half a year.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the title for "Back Fire" is actually “Chotto Otona no Daakuman” (“A More Mature Darkman”). A few years prior for the game Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together, he composed the last boss theme named “Darkman Abikyoukan” (“Darkman Pandemonium”), which he described as an "up-tempo, kind of insane sounding song" on a level of madness that "Back Fire" couldn't quite reach, hence the title.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that "Run Past Through The Plain" ended up being the third battle theme. He thought that the two previous battle themes were too "in your face", so he decided to create a song with a central melody that sounded more friendly. Eventually it ended up sounding like "something you’d hear at a matsuri (local festival)".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the theme for "Unavoidable Battle" was the first battle theme he created. Before "Unavoidable Battle", he created another battle theme before it, but it felt too happy-sounding, so the team rejected it. As he reflected on it, he created "Unavoidable Battle" to be a more pointed, exaggerated song, while the rejected music was re-purposed and used for the Unit Introduction theme, which is played over the opening demo.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 1997 interview with the game's director Yasumi Matsuno, found within the Famicon Tsuushin magazine, he was asked if terrain effects were in the game. He reponded:

"“Strategy games must have terrain effects” — we didn’t want to be bound by that way of thinking. As far as the player’s experience, though, I do think terrain effects are fine if they’re for easily recognizable and obvious situations, like the difference between playing volleyball in a gym and on a sandy beach. But yeah, the effects we did add were a product of that way of thinking—the user’s experience—rather than arising from strategy conventions."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 1997 interview with the game's producer Hironobu Sakaguchi, found within the Famicon Tsuushin magazine, he was asked how the development of the game started. He responded:

"The title “Final Fantasy Tactics” was actually something I thought up four years ago. We even took out a trademark on the name. I’m a strategy game fan myself, and I had been thinking about what Final Fantasy would look like as a strategy game. I’m the type of person who comes up with a name first, so nothing much else had been concretely set down, but there was a “Final Fantasy Tactics” design document that I had made then. Unfortunately I was caught up in the development of the main FF series—which were coming out at a quick pace, one every 12-18 months—so my plans for FFT remained unrealized. But it is true that the kernel of the development goes back 4 years, to 1993."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 1997 interview with the game's director Yasumi Matsuno, found within the Famicon Tsuushin magazine, he was asked if his "grand, dramatic" music would be in the game. He responded:

"Actually, in the beginning the idea for the music was more in-line with Sakaguchi’s tastes: exciting, energetic, and upbeat music. But owing to the direction we decided to take with the game—or my personality—we changed it. If FFT had mainly involved Humans vs. Monsters battles, then I think exciting, upbeat music would have been very appropriate, but in this strategy game your opponents are other human beings, and that kind of bright, upbeat music wasn’t working. There’s also the fact that Final Fantasy Tactics takes place in a hard, serious world. So I think it’s only natural for the songs to be similar."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In the PSP War of the Lions remake, in Chapter 4 on the 1st of Cancer if you have kept Agrias, Mustaio, Alicia, and Lavian in your party and have 50,000 gil, there's a secret scene where if you stop at a town, Mustadio will buy Agrias a Tynar Rouge and hint at having feelings for her, with Ramza acting as his wingman. This scene can only be triggered once per game.
Contributed by Gultykappa
There are unused jobs that were applied to NPCs who never appear in combat.

Arc Duke is assigned to Barinten.
Art Witch is assigned to Balmafula.
Bi-Count is assigned to Rudvich.
Bishop is assigned to Simon.
Cardinal is assigned to Draclau.
Duke is assigned to Larg.
Another separate class named Duke is assigned to Goltana.
High Priest is assigned to Funeral.
Phony Saint is assigned to Ajora.
Contributed by Psychospacecow
There are five unused variations of fanfare present in the game files.
Contributed by Psychospacecow