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Concept art reveal two stages were in development. One resembled “a place where intercollegiate sports are played as well as a setting that looks like an ancient Olympian stadium,” art director Junji Morii described in Nintendo’s “Ask the Developers” series.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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The designs for the playable characters went through many design changes during development. The team considered having no arms or legs in a similar vein to Wii Sports. Another idea that was considered was designing “college student characters…with a theme of intercollegiate sports.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
In Volume 5 of Nintendo’s “Ask the Developers” series, director Yoshikazu Yamashita said development began as a request from Nintendo veteran Yoshiaki Koizumi sometime after the Nintendo Switch was released to the public.

The developers had trouble implementing brand-new sports into the game as their spiritual predecessors had all their ideas implemented into them.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Series: Yoshi
According to Steven Universe creator Rebecca Sugar, the inspiration for the show's background color palettes comes from the level aesthetics in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island, due to its colorful atmosphere and also being one of her favorite video games at the time.
Contributed by Tuli0hWut
Skullgirls
Valentine's design was officially changed on May 13th, 2014 via a patch update. The update changed all parts of her design that involve a red cross against a white background to be altered so the cross is colored pink instead. This was done in order to prevent legal action by the International Committee of the Red Cross.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
According to Steven L Kent’s book The Ultimate History of Video Games Vol 2, executive vice president and head of Marvel Games Jay Ong stated that after they terminated their licensing deal with Activision he offered the exclusivity deal to Microsoft, but it was ultimately turned down. Microsoft‘s strategy at the time was to focus on its own IP, and as such, it decided to pass on the offer.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards
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Within the game's data are early portraits depicting each of the game's protagonists and the Animal Friends, the latter of whom don't appear in the final release outside of cameos as Stone + Cutter Kirby's forms. Pre-release screenshots show these and similar portraits appearing in the game's HUD, not only corroborating earlier indications that Waddle Dee, King Dedede, Adeleine, and Ribbon were playable at an earlier point in development, but also indicating that the Animal Friends were planned to play a proper role at one point.
Contributed by game4brains
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When playing the game's tutorial "A Keeper's Training" on Expert mode, a secret room can be found after you finish the sword fight with the Sparring Partner. You must quickly run to the table behind the sparring arena and pick up the key, and then follow the Sparring Partner into the hallway he walked out of. This must be done quickly as a set of bars will lower to prevent entry not long after the Sparring Partner re-enters the hallway. Once in the hallway, continue past him to the right until you see a locked door. You can then either use the key to unlock it or bash the door open with the sword. Inside this room is a pair of crudely-modeled basketball hoops, complete with a basketball that can be equipped and thrown, and in the very back of the room, a Bedroll can be found containing a set of humorous quotes attributed to the developers during the making of the game.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
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In a November 2020 Medium article, Maddy Thorson, who served as the game's writer and director, confirmed longstanding rumors that Madeline, the protagonist of Celeste, is a transgender woman. Thorson described the game's story as allegorical for her own process of coming to terms with her gender identity, and stated that while the idea didn't initially come to her during development, she "began to form a hunch" while working on the DLC chapter "Farewell", becoming certain of Madeline's transgender status after the chapter's release. Thorson came out as transgender herself in the same article.

Thorson additionally stated that although the possibility of Madeline being trans was discussed with the rest of the development team when making "Farewell", they ultimately decided not to include any overt statements past visual allusions in the chapter's ending, stating that it would be more in-character for Madeline to keep such information private. At the same time, however, Thorson stated that had she started development of Celeste already knowing that she was trans, she would've depicted Madeline differently.
Contributed by game4brains
Mario Kart 7
According to environment artist Ted Anderson in an interview with YouTuber KIMI TALKZ, Retro Studios was apparently hesitant on working with Nintendo to create the game:

“Initially I think we were supposed to help them finish stuff out and help them get over the finish line. It ended up being where we ended up making more than that; we ended up making entire tracks from scratch. It was kind of funny, because I remember initially that a good deal of the team was kind of not super-duper excited about that, but I was stoked, I was thinking "this is gonna be awesome". Everybody else was kinda like "ok, I guess we're gonna do this", and I'm like "what are you talking about, we're gonna make a Mario Kart game for the 3DS - wow!"
Contributed by GamerBen144
Dōbutsu no Mori
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Among the files included in the Gigaleak, a massive 2020 content leak of internal data from Nintendo, are models associated with Dōbutsu no Mori depicting three human characters not seen in the final game: two redcoat soldiers, one tall and one short, and a middle-aged woman in an apron. These characters appear to be early versions of Copper, Booker, and Joan, respectively, which is corroborated by the fact that the woman's filename is "oba," with Joan's sleeping animation being labeled "Sleeping_Obaba" in the files for Dōbutsu no Mori.

All of this appears to indicate that special characters were originally intended to be human before being changed to unique animals later in development; in the final game, the only humans that appear on-screen are the player characters. Copper and Booker would later reincorporate the scrapped redcoat motif in Animal Crossing: Wild World and Animal Crossing: City Folk.
Contributed by game4brains
Persona 5
Originally, the cutscene that plays after Spoiler:the Phantom Thieves believe Ryuji to be dead after the destruction of Shindo's palace was going to feature extra lines of dialogue not present in the final game, as well as a dialogue tree for Joker, the player's character. Additionally, there are unused animations in the game's files Spoiler:showing the Phantom Thieves beating up Ryuji. In the final game, the scene cuts to black.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Tornado Outbreak
Originally, instead of controlling a Wind Warrior in co-op mode, the player would have taken control of Nimbus. A partially unused transformation animation (which was re-purposed into a flying transition animation for the final game) and a stunned animation for Nimbus can be found in the game's files.
Contributed by Larrye
Street Fighter III
Urien's ending in Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike was going to be somewhat different, as seen in early storyboards.

The storyboards show that the building of the secret society was going to be a modern skyscraper in the middle of a city while the final game shows a building similar to the Tower of Babel in the desert.

Additionally, the ending featured a giant sphere containing the brains of past Illuminati leaders. This was replaced in the final game with tubes containing the bodies.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Heritage for the Future was named after Stardust Crusaders' (the story arc in which this game is based on) original name during serialization in Weekly Shōnen Jump, Part 3 Jotaro Kujo: Heritage for the Future.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
In the 34th entry of the Anime News Network series Jason Thompson's House of 1000 Manga, Jason Thompson stated that Capcom USA was disatisfied with how Jojo's Venture was doing in arcades at the time, to the point that he was told by a Capcom USA employee that they wouldn't release the game on home consoles "unless CAPCOM Japan forced them to".
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
In June 2013 interview with game's designer Toshinobu Kondo published in the Action Gameside magazine, he was asked what meaning there was in the game's title "Sayonara"? He responded:

"That title is a holdover from when we were thinking this would be a final fan service item for the Umihara Kawase series. It had a nice sense of impact so we kept it even as the concept of the game changed. The title conveys a sense of being ready for the end, along with the wish to return."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Walking Dead: Season One
The game was originally pitched by Telltale as a spin-off of Valve's Left 4 Dead franchise, but Valve turned down the pitch leaving Telltale to go to Robert Kirkman to successfully pitch him a game based on his Walking Dead comic book series. The same unique choice-based story-driven style of gameplay was kept by Telltale developers between the canceled Left 4 Dead project and the greenlit Walking Dead project, which the devs thought was a better fit for Kirkman's universe than Valve's franchise anyway and which would also be a style that would be reused heavily by Telltale in their later licensed games.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Catherine
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Within the game's data is an original cover of the song "Battle! Wild Pokémon" from Pokémon Diamond & Pearl. In addition, an early placeholder texture for score rankings features the names of numerous Pokémon characters.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Within the game's files is an arrangement of "Tifa's Theme" from Final Fantasy VII, presumably having been used to test out the game's soundfont before implementing any original music.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
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