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Rachel's close-quarters fighting style and moves are heavily based on Spartan-458 from Dead or Alive 4, who could not appear in Dead or Alive 5 due to copyright issues.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
Goenitz's namesake comes from an alien character in the 1974 anime Space Battleship Yamato. His "Heavenly King" title is a reference to the opening theme of the 1979 anime adaptation of Cyborg 009.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
Series: Ikari
The namesake of Heidern, the commander of the Ikari Warriors first introduced in Ikari III: The Rescue, comes from Wemm Heidern from the 1974 anime Space Battleship Yamato.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
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For Dead or Alive 3, Team Ninja considered replacing the entire roster of the past two games with a new set of characters, with Hitomi as the new heroine to replace Kasumi. This idea was scrapped, with the exception of Hitomi's inclusion as a fighter.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
According to the game's executive producer Takeshi Miyaji in a 2000 Dreamcast Magazine interview, the interviewer asked him if the game's target demographic would be a little older now given that Grandia II was the second game in the series, and he responded:

"Yeah. To begin with, obviously the people who played Grandia are also now 3-4 years older. So that was one reason we raised our target age.

The other reason is that, with the Grandia series, we don’t want to make the same game every time. The last game was a young boy’s tale of adventure, but in Grandia we wanted to show other things. By raising the target age, we could make the world a little more edgy and mature."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Attachment
In the German release of the game, the color of the red blood in the international releases of the game was changed to green to tone down the game's violence.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
According to English voice actor Sean Chiplock during a 2020 Reddit AMA, he was asked how did he get to voice Noob Saibot. He responded:

"Pretty much the same as I potentially get any other role; my agency sent me audition sides for the character, I submitted my audition takes, and the client decided they liked one of them enough to cast me! The character/project was codenamed at the time so I didn't know what it was for, but the specs asked for something "wraith-life and not of this world". So for the first take, I did something higher pitched and ghostly, with a little bit of teeth; for the second, I impersonated Black Doom from Shadow the Hedgehog's game on GameCube, and aimed for a baritone demonic rumble."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Trials of Mana
In a 1995 interview with the game's director Hiromichi Tanaka and designer Koichi Ishii, found within the Family Computer Magazine and Famitsu, they were asked when did they began planning out the game. They commented:

Tanaka: "We started drafting the plans for SD3 two years ago. We then went through a period of trial-and-error, where we programmed a lot of different systems, erased them, programmed them anew, erased them… and so forth, until finally we came up with something we now like."

Ishii: "We more or less wanted SD3 to be a continuation of Secret of Mana, but we ended up scrapping all the code from Secret of Mana. It was like, “All these parts that weren’t interesting, let’s try starting from a blank slate and finding another way.” So we essentially reconstructed all the programming for SD3 anew."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Trials of Mana
In a 1995 interview with the game's designer Koichi Ishii, found within the Family Computer Magazine and Famitsu, he was asked how the game's team created the "three-dimensional" quality in the game's map, characters and monsters. He responded:

"For example, take a boss battle like the fight with Mispolm. That battle is presented to the player from a certain visual angle. If you completely ignore the background when you’re creating the sprites, then the sense of orientation of the scene gets completely messed up. That’s why we had the sprite artists and the background artists work in tandem for SD3, communicating closely with each other as they went.

We’re aiming for something better than Disney. Also, for shadows and the like, we’re using deep blues and purples instead of shades of black, to impart a sense of softness. If you use black for that there’s a tendency for things to look cold and sterile. As I mentioned, visually we wanted to go for a more storybook, fantasy vibe rather than something realistic. It’s the same direction we went with in Secret of Mana, but in that game we didn’t have enough memory to fully express what we wanted."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The King of Fighters '98
Attachment
The "Japan Street" stage is based on a viaduct next to Esaka Train Station and SNK's headquarters, in Osaka.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
In a 2001 interview with the game's illustrator Tonko (Aki Senno), found within the Arcadia magazine, she was asked if both Garou: Mark of the Wolves (MOW) and The Last Blade had the same staff working on them. She responded:

"No, it wasn’t. MOW was originally being developed by a very select group; later, a few of the Last Blade staff joined in. The waterfall stage, and several others, were done by The Last Blade staff. Visually I think you can see a bit of The Last Blade’s style in those stages."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Console: Genesis
According to a 1998 interview with Sega R&D head Hideki Sato published in The History of SEGA Console Hardware, the Mega Drive's design from Japan was based on the audio player's appearance, and presented the "16-bit" label embossed with a golden metallic veneer to give it an impact of power:

"We had a feeling that before long, consumers would be appreciating video games with the same sense with which they enjoyed music; moreover, since the Megadrive was a machine that you put in front of your TV, our concept was to make it look like an audio player. So we painted the body black and put the “16BIT” lettering in a gold print. That gold printing, by the way, was very expensive. (laughs) But we really wanted to play up the fact that this was the very first 16-bit home console."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 2004 interview with D (a pseudonym for one of four members of DECO [Data East Corporation] interviewed), found within the Arcade Gamer vol.1 mook (magazine/book portmanteau), he was asked how development on Outlaws of the Lost Dynasty began. He responded:

"One day our boss came in and declared, “You know what would be a big hit in China? A game based on Suikoden!” And we were off. Most of the staff was a bit perplexed, “Huh? Suikoden… why not Sangokushi (Romance of the Three Kingdoms) instead?” In any event, the development schedule was very short so it was a tough one."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Series: Lufia
In a 2016 interview with Lufia & the Fortress of Doom's director Masahide Miyata, he was asked where the Japanese name 'Estpolis Denki' (Japanese for Biography of Estpolis) comes from. He responded:

"Estopolis Denki was originally developed under the title “Esuteeru”, but someone had already taken out the copyright for that name, so we had to change it. We chose Estopolis since the root of the word resembled Esuteeru. Estopolis means “City of the East”, and we imagined this world having four continents, in the east, west, north, and south."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 2016 interview with the director of the first game in the series Masahide Miyata, he was asked how development on Lufia & the Fortress of Doom began. He responded:

"Four or five of us got together and started talking about making our own RPG. We developed a prototype version of “Esuto” for the PC-98, and shopped it around to different companies for distribution. This was before the era of things like powerpoint presentations, so we lugged a PC-98 and CRT monitor around with us to give our pitch. Taito was one of those companies we presented to. Then once the development was officially underway, the idea came up that, since we were gonna do this after all, we might as well make it for the Super Famicom."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Night Trap
Night Trap: 25th Anniversary Edition, an expanded 2017 re-release of the game for the PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch and PC, uses the full uncompressed video footage recorded for the original game. Additional bonus content includes deleted scenes like an introduction scene for the game's story and a death scene featuring Danny (which was most likely cut due to Danny's young age), as well as a behind-the-scenes developer commentary, a "theater mode" to watch all of the game's story, a "survivor mode" that will randomly place Augers in the house, and a playable version of "Scene of the Crime", the first prototype of Night Trap created in 1986 to pitch an unreleased console called the Control-Vision to Hasbro.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 2010 interview with the game's director Hiroyuki Maruyama, he stated that he originally wanted to release the game on the Xbox. Despite the console's poor sales around the time it was being made, he was very interested in the network capabilities of Xbox Live, so he tried to get in touch with Microsoft to release the game on that platform. Instead, Microsoft asked the developers to release the game on their next console, the Xbox 360.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
In a 1995 interview with the game's director Yasumi Matsuno, found within the Dengeki SFC magazine, he clarified that the game was a part of the Ogre Battle series, but it was not a direct sequel to Ogre Battle: The March of The Black Queen. The games' world and environments are shared, but the gameplay systems are completely dissimilar. When asked why the gameplay system was changed, he responded:

"First off, after we finished the Ogre Battle development, we determined that doing another 3D real-time simulation game for the Super Famicom was going to be difficult. There is a special chip now for the SFC that offers more possibilities, but it’s also very expensive to use [this could be referring to the Super FX chip]. Therefore, we abandoned the idea of doing another, powered-up version of Ogre Battle, and instead decided to develop a brand new system."

"Another reason was that we actually started the planning for Tactics Ogre three months before the release of Ogre Battle. To decide on a direct sequel then would have been pointless if Ogre Battle didn’t sell well, and we didn’t have any confidence that it would. Ultimately it was very popular, so we carried over just the world and setting."

"Also, in Ogre Battle the units moved in real-time, which meant you couldn’t take your time and plan out a strategy. For us, this was a big point we wanted to improve on. From the beginning of the Tactics Ogre development, therefore, we never saw real-time as an option."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy VIII
According to a 1998 Famitsu magazine interview with the game's character designer Tetsuya Nomura, preliminary meetings to plan out Final Fantasy VIII with the game's team, including director Yoshinori Kitase, began immediately after the completion of Final Fantasy VII's development.

During one of the conversations, Kitase said that he wanted to use a character that Nomura drew 3 years ago, before Final Fantasy VII, which was the sorceress Edea Kramer.

He added that although the Final Fantasy series has the word "Fantasy" in its name, it had become routine for them to feature technological civilizations and machines, and he felt the fantasy aspect had steadily weakened its presence. Therefore, Edea was added to the game to genuinely counteract those growing technological aesthetics: "a full-on, high-fantasy sorceress".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
According to game's director Yasumi Matsuno in a 1995 Dengeki SFC magazine interview, it took the developers two and a half years (including several delays) to make the game, and by the end expressed that he was extremely tired from its development.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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