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Nintendo 64 - Did You Know Gaming? Feat. Brutalmoose
Goldeneye 007 (N64) - Did You Know Gaming? Feat. Brutalmoose
 
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Creator of Mario, Shigeru Miyamoto, sent the game's developers a fax with suggestions for the game. The first suggestion was that there was too much close-up killing, which he found to be too horrible. The second was to have the player to shake all of the hands of the enemies who were in hospital at the end of the game. This suggestion gave the idea to have all of the characters introduced in the credits as if portrayed by real actors. This so was to explain that this was all not real killing.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
Originally the violence in the game was to be more graphic with "beautifully" rendered gore that would explode, but the game's director, Martin Hollis, thought it later to be a bit too much.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The Japanese version curiously removes the hunting knife weapon, which in other versions is only available through the use of cheat codes. Instead, the Japanese version has a cheat code that gives Bond a paired rocket launcher and sniper rifle (with full ammo for each weapon). When using the two weapons together, the sniper rifle's adjustable scope can be used. Unlike the 2x weapon cheats, each weapon can also be used separately.
Contributed by game4brains
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If the player hurries through the Dam level quickly enough, they will be able to see a guard walking through the first set of security gates. Since he's animated on a pre-set path, he'll actually ignore Bond until he reaches his destination, at which point he'll react and start shooting.
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The Terrorist multiplayer character cannot be found anywhere in the single player game. However, the instruction manual for the game lists the Phantom weapon as a 'terrorist favorite', and the Phantom is only found on the Frigate level. The Frigate level is also the only level with hostages, which would likely indicate the involvement of terrorists. This suggests that the Terrorist was once used as an enemy on the Frigate, but was removed and kept in multiplayer.
Many of the levels in the game were first designed without any objective set in mind. Only after the levels were created did the designers go back and try to decide the player's starting positions, enemy locations, and objective placements. This is the reason many levels in the game seem to have rooms or areas without any obvious purpose. According to Martin Hollis of Rare,

The benefit of this sloppy unplanned approach was that many of the levels in the game have a realistic and non-linear feel. There are rooms with no direct relevance to the level. There are multiple routes across the level. This is an anti-game design approach, frankly. It is inefficient because much of the level is unnecessary to the gameplay. But it contributes to a greater sense of freedom, and also realism. And in turn this sense of freedom and realism contributed enormously to the success of the game.
During a speech made in 2004, Martin Hollis from Rare revealed that GoldenEye 007 was expected to fail miserably upon launch, after a poor reception at E3. Not only was the game a first-person shooter on a console system (unheard of at the time), it was also a movie license (which were frequently garbage) and was being released over two years after the actual movie came out. The game went on to become the best-selling game on the N64, beating Mario Kart 64, Super Mario 64, and Ocarina of Time.
According to Martin Hollis of Rare, the concept of adding multiple objectives per level was inspired by the level design of Super Mario 64.
The game's entire multiplayer mode was made in a month as a complete afterthought by programmer Steve Ellis. The management at Rare did not even know they were developing a multiplayer mode until they were shown a complete, working product. According to Ellis, 'since the game was already late by that time, if we hadn't done it that way, it probably never would have happened.'
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A placeholder model for objects that were not finished yet is still in the game. Strangely, it is a Borg cube from Star Trek: The Next Generation.
Contributed by Antwan
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Alec Trevelyan is seen being right-handed in all solo missions except for "Control".
The theme music of the level "Frigate" features parts taken from the theme of the James Bond film "A View to a Kill" by Duran Duran, and other parts inspired by the song "We Care A Lot" by Faith No More.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
During development, the Silo mission was originally slated to be a Casino level to tie-in better with the movie. Various items can be found though the games code such as a gold bar, a token, and money.
Contributed by Goldeneye
Goldeneye was originally going to be an on-rails shooter before making the jump to full player control.
Contributed by Goldeneye
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The watch Bond wears actually tells time, and counts constantly regardless if the game is paused or not.
Contributed by Goldeneye
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The sky in the beta version of Surface 1 was originally white and cloudless, which gave the impression that it was snowing.
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A beta version of the Statue level took place during the day and had a gray, cloudless sky with very thick fog. The statues were also laid out differently. Leftover references in code also indicate that truck was more than likely intended to appear in the ending cut scene.
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While rendezvousing with Valentin in the Statue level, a guard outside can be seen running past the boxcar some distance away. This soldier actually does nothing; if you follow him, he will ignore everything (including you) and will disappear at the bottom of the hill.
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At the beginning of the Facility level, players are required to open a door with a computer switch in order to progress to the next area. Unfortunately, the computer can be destroyed, leaving players stuck in the starting area. In order to get around this, the developers added a scientist that eventually rushes to the bathroom. He is carrying keycard A, which will open all of the doors in the level (with the exception of the bottling room, which requires the door decoder).
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There are several small guard towers found throughout both Surface levels. Despite having guards armed with sniper rifles, none of them are placed on these towers. The reason why the towers aren't utilized has to do with how the game handles guards' line of sight and gunfire. Guards can only see Bond if they have a clear line of sight to him across collision tiles. Since the towers' collision tiles only connect to the ground's tiles at their ladders, the only place guards could actually see Bond is when he was standing in front of the ladder. Even if sight was faked, as the game does elsewhere, bullets work in the same way as line-of-sight and will be blocked by the collision tiles. Both of these limitations combined would have rendered any snipers on the towers completely ineffective. The towers were kept in the game merely for decoration and completeness.
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In the Dam level, there is a blue metal trapdoor on the floor in a guardhouse that serves no purpose in the final game. Many believe it was part of an older objective that was taken out of the game. Some speculate that Bond previously had to retrieve his tracker bug for the mission in this hatch, since the message "Picked up a bug" can be found in the game's memory but is never used in the game. Others speculate Bond previously picked up explosives here for a lost objective requiring players to blow up the truck. Still others believe it was merely a quicker way to the comms room below the dam, since it is almost directly above it. It's true purpose remains a mystery.
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The Statue and Cradle levels were once both playable multiplayer levels, but were taken out of the final game. Both can be accessed and played with a GameShark, and both levels contain weapons, ammo, and body armor. However, Cradle had severe lag issues, especially with more than two players. Statue also suffered from frame rate issues and contained several glitched areas that would not load properly and turn black. It was likely these levels were both taken out for these reasons.
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The runway level was originally supposed to include a controllable motorbike, similar to the movie. However, no motorbike appears in the final version of the game. It was likely scrapped before the release due to the difficulty of controlling the bike in a first person shooter. A miniature model of the bike was ultimately placed on a desk in one of the huts on Surface as pure decoration. A life size model of the bike also still exists in the game's memory and is accessible through codes.
In the dam level, there are three guard towers on the main dam, and one across the lake on the hidden island. The ones on the dam are marked 2, 3, and 4 in order, and the one on the island doesn't have one. So what happened to tower #1? Some speculate that it was immediately to your right once you shot the lock to the dam, but was probably removed and the programmers forgot to change the other numbers.
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Even after unlocking all 23 cheat options through the single player campaign, there is still an empty 24th space left in the cheat menu. This space is left for nine cheat options which cannot be unlocked during the course of the game. They can only be added to the menu using a GameShark. The cheat options include:

Extra Characters (800696XX 0001)
Maximum Ammo (80069654 0001)
Line Mode (80069657 0001)
Super 2X Health (80069658 0001)
Super 2X Armor (80069659 0001)
Extra Weapons (8006965D 0001)
Super 10X Health (80069660 0001)
Multiplayer Invisibility (80069666 0001)
Debug Position Display (80069669 0001)

Several of these cheats can also be activated by button codes in-game.
The Goldeneye 007 instruction booklet lists a Soviet weapon called the Spyder. However, no weapon by the name of the Spyder is found in the final game. The name Spyder was actually dropped due to legal reasons, and the gun was renamed the Klobb after Nintendo of America's Ken Lobb, who helped the game during its development. The manual was simply printed without the correction made, or it was printed before the name change took place. Before being named the Spyder, the gun was also called the Skorpion, based on its real-world counterpart, the Skorpion VZ/61.
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In the Frigate level, there is a locked door on each side of the ship's bridge. They are impossible to get trough without a GameShark and only lead to a small balcony overlooking the ship's deck. Why they were left in the game (or what purpose they could have once possibly served) remains a mystery.
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In the first Bunker level, there is a Russian commandant who carries a PP7 special issue. He is the only commandant in the game who carries a PP7 - all the others carry DD44s. Why this guard would use the same gun as Bond remains a mystery.
David Doak, a video game developer who once worked for Rare, was part of the Goldeneye 007 development team. He was rendered into the game as Dr. Doak in the 2nd mission.
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There are actually several floating doors in the Frigate level that are accessible if you perform a few glitches. The doors are left over from when the developers decided to turn them into doorways, but chose not to delete the doors for some reason. They still exist in the level's geometry, but only from certain angles.

In order to see them, turn on Tiny Bond from the cheat menu, and head for the first set of stairs heading down to the engine room. If you do the floating Tiny Bond glitch (crouch with R and C-Down) and walk down the stairs, you'll float over them and into the geometry of the level. Eventually you will see a door floating in space. If you open this door in mid air, go through it, and turn right, you will see a second door floating in mid-air as well. You cannot reach the second door without falling down, however.

If you plant remote mines on the floating doors, then go back around to the hallway and detonate the mines, they'll explode in front of you without any visible fireball. The explosion will merely send bits and pieces of debris flying everywhere.
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Timothy Dalton, Sean Connery and Roger Moore are all hidden in the game's code. They can be accessed via cheat codes, but only in the game's menus.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
The code of the game hides a working ZX Spectrum emulator. A Rare developer, Steve Ellis, coded it simply to see if it was possible.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
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In the first level of the game, the Dam, there's a small island near the end which can be seen from afar. The island features a guard tower and an inoperable drone gun with some beta textures. It can only be reachable using a cheat device and a no clipping cheat enabled.

Left over code suggest the player had to travel to the island and retrieve proper equipment to perform a bungee jump. 'Piton Gun' and 'Bungee' can still be seen in the games code, and a Piton Gun is what Bond used in the movie to get to the facility. However, according to Duncan Botwood, one of the developers on the game, it was originally planned for players to investigate the area and find some armor as a reward.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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There's a hidden test level called "Citadel" found in the game's coding. It was designed during the early stages of multiplayer and had it been functional in the finished game, Oddjob and Mayday wouldn't have been available to play.

The level can only be accessed through the use of a cheat device, however it isn't properly playable.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
At one point in GoldenEye's development, reloading your weapon was going to be triggered by removing and reinserting the N64 Rumble Pack as if you were removing a magazine on a gun.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming