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Console: Master System
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Due to South Korea banning Japanese cultural imports at the end of World War II, the Master System was distributed by South Korean company Samsung, and was named the Gam*Boy.
Contributed by Berry
Console: SNES
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Due to South Korea banning Japanese cultural imports at the end of World War II, the SNES was distributed by South Korean company Hyundai, and was named the Super Comboy.
Contributed by Berry
Console: NES
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Due to South Korea banning Japanese cultural imports at the end of World War II, the NES was distributed by South Korean company Hyundai, and was named the Comboy.

Many consoles in South Korea were released under alternate names and published by various Korean companies, including the Game Boy, Genesis, Master System, Game Gear, SNES and Nintendo 64.
Contributed by Berry
Console: Game Boy
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Due to South Korea banning Japanese cultural imports at the end of World War II, the Nintendo Game Boy was distributed by South Korean company Hyundai, and was named the Mini Comboy.
Contributed by Berry
Console: Genesis
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Due to South Korea banning Japanese cultural imports at the end of World War II, the Sega Genesis was distributed by South Korean company Samsung, and was named the Super Gam*Boy.
Contributed by Berry
Series: Pokémon
In the Japanese versions of Pokemon, the attack "Night Slash" is called "Blade Testing". This is a reference to an old practice that some immoral samurai held to test their new swords. They would wait alongside a road at night for a random passer-by, then attack them with the intention to kill. Night Slash also has a higher than average critical hit rate, which could be another nod to the story, as the passer by would be defenseless.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Super Mario World
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In the Japanese version, Yoshi can eat the dolphins. This was removed from the international release. It's thought it was removed because of the different cultural views towards dolphins, or simply to make the level easier to finish, as the dolphins can be used as platforms. This was added back into all versions of the Game Boy Advance version.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door
In the German version, the Snow World is called "Großfrostheim" which translates into "Great Frost Home". This, however, is a reference to the German city "Großostheim", which is where the Nintendo of Europe headquarters are located, and where the game was localized.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Sonic Adventure 2
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In the City Escape stage, there's a hidden message in one of the posters. "Anti XXXX XX2 Association". Since there is a 2 at the end of the XX, and the number of letters matches up, it was thought to stand for "Anti Sony PS2 Association". At the time, the Dreamcast was being dominated by the Playstation 2 in sales.
The text was removed from later versions of the game.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door
In the Spanish version, Rawk Hawk is named Hawk Hogan as a reference to Hulk Hogan.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Mind Quiz: Your Brain Coach
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Your Brain Coach was voluntarily pulled from stores in the United Kingdom after release due to complaints that the word "spastic" was triggered when a player didn't perform well. The game was never re-released, but is still sold with the European English language in Australia, as it isn't considered particularly offensive there.

A similar incident occurred with Mario Party 8 just one month later.
Contributed by Dazz
Mario Party 8
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Mario Party 8 was recalled in the United Kingdom due to the character "Kamek" saying the word "Spastic". The word is considered highly offensive in the UK, as it has been used to mock the disabled.

A similar issue occurred with the word in Mind Quiz: Your Brain Coach.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
In the Japanese games, Super Mario World's "Forest of Illusion" and The Legend of Zelda's "Lost Woods" share the name, "Mayoi no Mori" (Lost Forest). All the standard exits in the Forest of Illusion send you around in circles which is comparable to the Lost Woods circling you back to the entrance after a wrong turn.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Super Mario World
In the Japanese games, Super Mario World's "Forest of Illusion" and The Legend of Zelda's "Lost Woods" share the name, "Mayoi no Mori" (Lost Forest). All the standard exits in the Forest of Illusion send you around in circles which is comparable to the Lost Woods circling you back to the entrance after a wrong turn.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island
In the German version of Yoshi's Island, "Naval Piranha" is called "Audrey", referencing The Little Shop of Horrors.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
Trouble Shooter
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In the Japanese version of Trouble Shooter (known as Battle Mania), if you hold the C button on controller two while the game starts up, it displays the game's protagnosit stomping curiously on a Super Famicom (The Japanese Super Nintendo). Apparently the developers were Sega fans, and were annoyed when funding for their game was moved to Nintendo projects. They decided to get their own back by hiding this screen in the game.
Contributed by DidYouKnowGaming
The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask
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The Japanese version of Majora's Mask contained three save slots as opposed to the two that the American release saw. However, in the Japanese version, the owl saving feature did not exist, making the Song of Time the only way to save. This proved to be annoying and owl saving was added to the American release, at the cost of one save slot.
Contributed by Petie
Pokemon Puzzle League
Pokemon Puzzle League is the only Pokemon game to be released exclusively to the Western market, and not in Japan.
Contributed by Dazz
Mega Man X5
In the North American localization of the game, the 8 Mavericks's names were translated by Alyson Court, voice actress for Clair Redfield of the Resident Evil series, and starred as Loonette in The Big Comfy Couch. The names were based on members of the rock band "Guns N' Roses". The translations are:

Crescent Grizzly -> Grizzly Slash (Saul "Slash" Hudson)
Bolt Kraken -> Squid Adler (Steven Adler)
Shining Hotarunicus -> Izzy Glow (Izzy Stradlin)
Tidal Makkoeen -> Duff McWhalen (Duff McKagen)
Spiral Pegacion -> The Skiver (Michael "High as the Sky" Monroe)
Spike Rosered -> Axle the Red (Axl Rose)
Dark Necrobat -> Dark Dizzy (Dizzy Reed)
Burn Dinorex -> Mattrex (Matt Sorum)
Contributed by Mighty Jetters
Mega Man X5
In the Japanese version of the game, there were narrator voices for each of the Maverick's names that you would hear during their intro sequence after you selected their stage. These were removed in the US release. In order played, the names are: Tidal Makkoeen, Dark Necrobat, Spike Rosered, Burn Dinorex, Dynamo, Shining Hotarunicus, Spiral Pegasus, Crescent Grizzly, and Bolt Kraken.
Contributed by Mighty Jetters
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