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The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past
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In a Japan-exclusive guidebook published by Nintendo and Ape Inc., there is artwork depicting Link praying before a Crucifix, contrasting the game's origin story of the three Golden Goddesses, but also fitting with the Japanese version of the game calling the Sanctuary a Church. The Church's name was changed to the Sanctuary outside of Japan, presumably due to Nintendo's international policy on religious imagery, although this artwork and the rest featured in this guidebook were never republished internationally as other publishers released their own guides instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Mario Party DS
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Due to South Korea banning casino gambling in video games, two of the minigames in "Bowser's Pinball Machine" were reworked. The Jackpot and Roulette minigames were changed to UFO and Whac-A-Mole minigames respectively.
The game was originally known as VHS Story (Video Hero Super Story) as a reference of the movies of the era. According to the team at Lazy Bear Games, the name was changed because many people misunderstood the title, thinking that it's a game about the video format itself.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
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The US version changed some plot details, most notably in how many kings are involved: while the Japanese version mentions three kings named Kells (ケルス), Rude (ルード), and Phillip (フィリップ), the English version changed nearly all of these to Edward (the exception being a mention of Kells near the beginning of the game). As the story is already extremely cryptic, this was likely done in an attempt to make things less confusing.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Pokémon Emerald
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In the Japanese release, the player is able to use Dive on the deep water tiles in Team Aqua's hideout due to a programming oversight. Because these tiles were never intended to lead anywhere, diving in them simply teleports the player back to Petalburg City, the lowest-indexed map location in the game. In the international release, this error is fixed by disallowing the player from using Dive in the hideout.

This glitch is not present in Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire, because in those games, the entrance to the hideout is no longer accessible after obtaining the Mind Badge, which is required to use Dive in the overworld.
Contributed by game4brains
Pokémon Yellow
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In the Virtual Console release of the game, Jynx's sprite is altered to change her skin color from black to purple, keeping in line with the character's redesign since the international releases of Pokémon Gold & Silver in 2000, which was implemented following complaints from African-American writer Carole Boston Weatherford that the original design was evocative of blackface imagery.

While Game Boy and Game Boy Color sprites only allow for a maximum of three colors, the game's in-battle assets are composed of multiple 8x8 sprites composited together. Thus, the Virtual Console release was able to recolor Jynx's skin by only altering some of these tiles to replace black with purple. As no other Pokémon use this method, this makes Jynx's altered design the highest-detail Pokémon in any version of the Generation I games.
Contributed by game4brains
Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge
The Japanese FM Towns release of Monkey Island 2 is completely missing the so-called "cliffside puzzle" (which involves stealing a fish from a chef, trading the fish to a fisherman for a rod, and casting your line over a cliff, so a seagull appears and snatches the piece of the treasure map away).

At first, it was speculated this was either a bug (with one person going so far as to officially submit it as a bug for the ScummVM emulator in 2006) or censorship. But looking at the game's source code, the change was seemingly intentional, with additional lines of code being added to tell the program to skip the correct sequence of events.

When asked about this, even former developers and play testers couldn't explain or remember why. Recent consensus is that this was most probably because of a technical issue involving vertical scrolling (where if the screen moved up and down you couldn't have objects or animations on the screen at the same time or the game's script would break - and the cliffside "room" is the only room in the game to feature vertical scrolling).
Contributed by DarkChojin
Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
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Contrary to the official explanation about Kirby's lack of a Keyblade after inhaling Sora, there is an unused Keyblade model for Kirby, meaning that at some point in the development of the final DLC Fighter, Kirby would have indeed wielded Sora's Kingdom Key during the use of Sora's Neutral Special, but this idea was scrapped. The weapon can be found in the game's data but remains functionally unfinished, and even when the game is modded the Keyblade will not spawn in.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
On May 23, 1999, wrestler Owen Hart passed away due to an equipment malfunction during his entrance into the wrestling ring, dropping him to his death. In light of this, the game was delayed from its original June 3, 1999 release date to August 5th that year, and they dedicated it to Hart in the Nintendo 64 and PlayStation versions.

The Dreamcast version, however, completely omits the dedication due to a wrongful death lawsuit brought against the WWE (then known as the WWF) from the Hart family. However, he is still a playable character in the game.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped
In numerous official video game demo compilation discs (such as the fondly regarded Pizza Hut demo disk that came about as a promotional stunt co-jointed by Sony Computer Entertainment America and Pizza Hut), there was a "late demo" of Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped included, featuring a playable beta version of the level "Under Pressure".

As this version of the stage came from an earlier build of the game, there are distinguished differences between this version and the final version. Two differences that stand out between versions is that the signature pufferfish is purple instead of its usual orange, and that the Time Trial record times differ in such a manner that the demo version appeared to be deemed too difficult shortly before the final build's completion and retail release.

In the demo:
•Sapphire Relic Time: 1:28:33
•Gold Relic Time: 1:04:93
•Platinum Relic Time: 0:58:73

In the final release version:
•Sapphire Relic Time: 1:46:00
•Gold Relic Time: 1:17:90
•Platinum Relic Time: 1:10:50
Contributed by Regen-33
The game was released for the original PlayStation under the title “M&M's: Shell Shocked.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
The Combatribes
The fifth and sixth stages are different between the Arcade and console versions.

In the arcade version the fifth stage is a high-rise building where you fight a militia working for the main villain, and when you reach the rooftop you fight the fifth boss of the game. The sixth and final stage is made of a boss rush where you fight all the previous gangs while chasing a big crime boss in the harbor. After defeating all the gangs, Spoiler:the crime boss gets killed and the final battle against Martha Splatterhead ensues.

In the console version the boss rush takes place in the fifth stage instead, right before facing the militia. The sixth and final stage is simply the final boss battle set atop the rooftop of the high-rise building, with the harbor stage being completely removed. Additionally Spoiler:the crime boss from the arcade version is missing in the SNES port, which establishes Martha Splatterhead as the leader of the gangs early on.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
The Combatribes
The original arcade release features a very minimalistic story, with the only cutscene being a short monologue that plays after beating the game. The console release expands the story by introducing cutscenes that play before and after fighting a boss, as well as an opening intro explaining the plot and a different ending.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
The Combatribes
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The arcade version uses numeric values to represent the player's character health, while the console version uses a life bar.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
The Combatribes
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The console release features short cutscenes that play after defeating a boss. The Super Famicon version features blood on the defeated boss' portrait whereas the Super Nintendo version has no blood. Depending on the portrait the blood was recolored to look like either saliva or tears, or it was completely removed.
Contributed by ZpaceJ0ck0
Hardware limitations of the original PlayStation caused the development team to cut the frame rate in half and have only a handful of enemies appear on the screen at a time, among other technical restraints.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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In an early unused version of the "Mountain of Rubble" cutscene, Fiona is voiced by a different voice actress, but she is completely silent in the final version. In addition, there's a unique music in the cutscene that was removed in the final version, and the dirt effects when Fiona falls back down were originally brown instead of grey.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Console: Genesis
"Blast processing" is a marketing term coined by Sega of America to promote the Sega Genesis as the cooler and more powerful console compared to the SNES. It was such an effective campaign that it caused Nintendo to spend millions of dollars to ramp up their own smear campaign to rebut the claims, helping to create the textbook example of a "console war" between two rivaling video game companies through aggressive marketing and advertising. It is true that Blast processing as presented in advertisements at the time does not exist in any released Genesis game, but its creation was based on a real feature that ultimately went unused by developers: a low-level processing method that was progressive for its time.

The basic idea is that the hardware's video processor is "blasted" continuously, with the Genesis' 68000 processor working flat-out to change the color of every individual pixel during an active scan, a process where the "guns" on a CRT screen move from left to right and then down to the next line and so on. It was believed at the time that this function could be used to increase the Genesis' somewhat constrained color palette to showcase 256 color static images if timed right (this number would be exceeded by other developers like Jon Burton from Traveller's Tales who later discovered the trick).

Sega of America Senior Producer Scott Bayless claimed that Sega technical director Marty Franz first discovered the trick by "hooking the scan line interrupt and firing off a DMA [direct memory access] at just the right time", as firing it off at the wrong time would result in the scan lines appearing out of phase. This timing/synchronization issue, on top of the more pressing issue of the feature using all of the 68000's CPU time (meaning that while you could run the feature, you couldn't actually play the games that use it), effectively made it useless for cartridge games, and no shipped Genesis games ever used the feature. It’s speculated that it could have been used for Sega CD games, as the add-on had its own CPU that could run the feature, but this also did not come to pass.

The people responsible for the name "Blast processing" are Bayless and Sega of America's PR team. They interviewed him about the specs of the console, and he described to them how the feature could "blast data into the DAC's [digital-to-audio converters]". When talking about how the name came about, he assumed the PR team just liked the word "blast" without understanding what Bayless was explaining, and Blast processing was invented by them to more easily and vaguely sum up the technical capabilities of the Genesis when marketing it. Bayless later expressed reservations about the phrase, calling it "ghastly".

It should also be noted that this feature was not exclusive to the Genesis. In 2020, former Sculptured Software programmer Jeff Peters claimed that they discovered a similar technical trick on the SNES before Sega started using the phrase, but it was focused on audio rather than graphics. He claims that when porting Mortal Kombat to the SNES, Sculptured Software encountered an issue where the amount of graphics data being put onto the cartridge meant that sound had to be cut back drastically. To overcome this problem, Peters and his team used a homegrown system which allowed them to read sounds from the cartridge one at a time and blast them directly to a buffer in the sound memory. While the two tricks were achieving different things, it's interesting to note that both were possible on either console, despite Sega's insistence that only the Genesis could achieve Blast processing.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
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In the initial release of "The Ancient Gods - Part One" DLC on October 20, 2020, pressing the dedicated Chainsaw button four times while on the Runes tab of the Dossier would bring up an altered logo for the game reading "Doog Eternal". This is a reference to Inugami Korone, a Japanese Virtual YouTuber who livestreamed Doom 64 and Doom (2016) in the past. She enjoyed using the Chainsaw weapon and she was nicknamed by her community as "Doog Slayer" (a play on the fact that her model is a humanoid dog).

Three days later, the Easter egg was removed from the game in the Version 3.1 update. The patch notes acknowledged the discovery, but the reason why it was removed remains unknown:

"The DOOG easter egg has been removed, but will live on in infamy… We were wondering how long it would take for someone to notice, and as always, we're impressed with the community's speed!"
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Animal Crossing
In the Japanese version, Dōbutsu no Mori +, two of the NES games that the player could obtain were Gomoku Narabe and Mahjong. The international release respectively replaces these titles with Soccer and Excitebike.
Contributed by game4brains
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