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The game's cover artwork originally featured the American flag and green gaseous fumes, and on the back the words "WANTED: Deadly Force Authorized", "deadly arsenal" and "terrorists". However, due to the then recent 9/11 terrorist attacks and the anthrax scare, the game had been recalled with these removed and the back text changed to make it more politically correct. This pushed back the game from its original September 25th, 2001 release to early November 2001. Some copies with the original box art had already shipped, making that version a collector's item and dubbed the "9/11 American Flag Cover". It also came in a dual case, despite the game only having a single disc.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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In Australia & New Zealand, the game was released as Ricky Ponting International Cricket 2007 and in India as Yuvraj Singh International Cricket 2007, with on the covers cricketers Ricky Ponting and Yuvraj Singh; respectively.

Singh was also a brand ambassador for the Xbox 360 in India.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The game was released in North America as Sim Theme Park, part of Maxis' "Sim" brand of games, whilst in Europe and Asia it retained the "Theme" brand and was released as Theme Park World. The reason for the difference in title was because the "Sim" brand was more recognizable in the United States, as opposed to the "Theme" name which was more popular in the rest of the world.

According to Luc Barthelet, the General Manager of Maxis, he was jealous and wished Maxis had created the game but appreciated the opportunity to have it as part of the Sim franchise.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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The game was first released in 1998 on the PlayStation exclusively in Japan as Theme Aquarium, part of the "Theme" series of games by Bullfrog Productions. However, when it was released in 2000 for the PC exclusively in Europe, it was simply titled Aquarium with the "Theme" name and any mentions of Bullfrog Productions dropped.

The reason for the PlayStation version featuring the "Theme" brand was that the previous Theme games had proved popular in Japan so publisher EA Square wanted to help further generate interest by asking Bullfrog to use it in its marketing. When porting it to the PC for the West, the reason to simply release it as Aquarium was due to the belief that "the game quality wasn't high enough for it it come out in the West as a Theme game, with the Bullfrog brand," according to Shintaro Kanaoya, who provided localization assistance.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
Series: Shining
In an 'Shining Force Encyclopedia' interview with game's Producer/Designer Hiroyuki Takahashi, he was asked how his team came up with the Japanese title "Shining Force: The Legacy of the Gods". Takahashi stated: "We had a few different candidates for titles. The one we chose was suggested by the scenario writer. Originally, the title was simply 'Kamigami no Isan' ('Legacy of the Gods'). I’m something of a sci-fi diehard, and I read a bunch of sci-fi novels that had similar-sounding titles, like “the ___ of the ___”, so that’s why we settled on this one."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The decision to add Hitomi from Dead Or Alive 3 to the Dead Or Alive 2 remake was made by series producer Tomonobu Itagaki after the game's release was delayed.
Contributed by DrakeVagabond
Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Abby Trott, the vocalist of the English version of Lifelight, stated in a interview that she actually cried upon hearing that she would be involved in "Super Smash Bros. Ultimate." Trott, herself, was a Nintendo fan and hearing about this made her feel "very special."

“I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to audition through Cup of Tea Productions, and at the time I had no idea what the audition was for. For the first round, I submitted my singing demo. The second round involved singing a requested song (not ‘Lifelight’). I ended up being cast, and CRIED when I found out what the project was. As a life-long fan of Nintendo, being a part of Smash Bros. Ultimate is really special to me. I love ‘Lifelight’ so much.”
Contributed by GamerBen144
World of Warcraft
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In the Battle for Azeroth expansion there is a Kingdom Hearts reference. Specifically, if the player goes to the Thresher's Wharf area of Stormsong valley and climb a tall structure they can find three Beleaguered Watchmen looking out dramatically at the water. The way they are positioned, dressed, and how the scene is choreographed, make them look like the three original human characters from Kingdom Hearts: Sora, Kairi, and Riku.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Shovel Knight
While pausing the game during a meeting with the titular characters of Battletoads in the Xbox One version of the game, the pause menu theme from Battletoads will play.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
Six unused modes (Smoke Show, Party, Car Show, Cash Knockout, Tournament, and Theater) were all planned to appear in the GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox, and PC versions of the game.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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The GBA version was planned to have character's emotions within the text boxes similar to their previous Game Boy Color games. The character's faces were originally cartoonish in comparison to their more realistic ones seen in the final game.
Contributed by GamerBen144
Eleven of the game's licensed songs from the Japanese PlayStation version were removed in international release, instead utilizing four songs from Dance Dance Revolution 4th Mix and DDRMAX.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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The game was originally to be released as Free Wheelin' USA, but it was later changed to Hooters Road Trip featuring the Hooters license. The PC version however retained the original title with the Hooters brand completely absent.

Artwork for the original PlayStation version of Free Wheelin' USA can be found in the game's files.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
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There is an item in the game that was originally called "Switch". This item had it's name changed to "Light Switch" in a version 1.2.0. It's possible the name change came about so that players would not confuse the aforementioned item with the "Nintendo Switch" which is another obtainable item in the game.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
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A bizarre image of a turkey leg inside the EA Sports ring can be found in the original Playstation version's data. This also appears in the Madden 2002 to 2005 games.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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The North American version contains only Landon Donovan on the front cover, while the European version, known as FIFA Football 2003, has Roberto Carlos, Ryan Giggs, and Edger Davids on it instead.
Contributed by GamerBen144
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Within the second level of the Clock Tower stage, there's a hidden exit which in the Japanese version when entered will feature a cameo by a Japanese personality accompanied with a secret message from them. If encountered on either easy or normal difficulty, idol Hiroko Nakayama will appear with a different message on each difficulty. When encountered on hard mode, Weekly Famitsu chief editor Hirokazu Hamamura will appear. Both personalities were hosts of the video game TV show Game Catalogue II which also mentioned the secret in the July 8, 1995 episode with behind the scenes footage shown in the July 22, 1995 episode.
Contributed by KnowledgeBase
NSFW - This trivia is considered "Not Safe for Work" - Click to Reveal
A lot of error messages, sometimes vulgar, others hilarious, can be found in the PS2 version's data, including:

"Pad disconnected sometime in past...
duh? The fooking camera has fooked off!
Bad media type or no disk - PTOOIE!...
DVD drive is smoking crack!
Wot the hell? safety camera deleted!!!!"
Contributed by GamerBen144
Streets of Rage 3
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Ash is a mini boss that can only be encountered in Japanese versions of the game. He's a homosexual who's very stereotypical in both appearance and behavior. He prances around the stage, lets out a feminine laugh when he grabs the player and uses the female voice cry when defeated in battle. He can be unlocked as a playable character by pressing and holding the B button when he is defeated. He is the strongest out of all the characters and attacks fast.

Ash was removed from the North American and European versions of the game likely because of the obvious backlash SEGA would've received. His boss theme can still be heard but only in the BGM test screen.
Contributed by ShyanVixen
Resident Evil (2002)
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In the Arklay Laboratory, the 'MO disk reader' is actually the GameCube console, as at the time the game was exclusive to the GameCube. However, for the HD Remastered version, the 'MO disk reader' was altered on all platforms to avoid using a console related to Nintendo, even on Nintendo Switch.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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