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Hotel Mario
The music used in the game's opening cutscene, main menu/map screen, and end credits is taken almost note-for-note from Max Steiner's "Polka Melody", featured in the 1933 film adaptation of the novel "Little Women".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tomba!
In a 2011 interview with the game's composer Harumi Fujita published in issue #2 of STG Gameside magazine, she stated that at the time when she heard about Tokuro Fujiwara starting his own company named Whoopee Camp, she went to him and asked him to “Please use me somehow!”. Both of them had been working together on Famicom games since they worked at Capcom.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Attachment
In an early unused version of the "Mountain of Rubble" cutscene, Fiona is voiced by a different voice actress, but she is completely silent in the final version. In addition, there's a unique music in the cutscene that was removed in the final version, and the dirt effects when Fiona falls back down were originally brown instead of grey.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
If you listen closely to the music being played in the Divine Beasts, you can make out Morse code for "S.O.S." This is very likely a distress call the Champions made when they were attacked by the Ganon Blights 100 years prior to the start of the game.
Contributed by raidramon0
Milla from Freedom Planet was added as guest character in the Version 1.1 update.
Her theme song is based on her theme from Freedom Planet 2.
Contributed by SkyminHAZBOZ
Mario + Rabbids: Sparks of Hope
The game's title theme sounds similar to the Space Junk Galaxy theme from Super Mario Galaxy.
Contributed by CuriousUserX90
Ristar
On the first round of Planet Sonata, after delivering the last metronome to the bird robot, if you sit and wait for nearly a minute before going to the boss, a rendition of the nursery rhyme "Mary Had a Little Lamb" will start playing.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Kirby's Adventure
Part of Grape Garden's background music greatly resembles the song "Silver and Gold", sung by Burl Ives, from the animated holiday musical film "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer".
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Diddy Kong Racing
The music for Frosty Village seems to be a faster-paced, copyright-law-friendly version of the popular Christmas song "Winter Wonderland".

Part of the Walrus Cove theme also resembles Gene Autry's "Here Comes Santa Claus" in the same regard as well.
Contributed by PirateGoofy
Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 2
In the PlayStation version of Innocent Sin, if you wait on the Load screen for 4 minutes and 15 seconds, a short acoustic version of the game's ending theme "Next to You" will play.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Moon: Remix RPG Adventure
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In the Castle, in order to obtain Love from the castle guard Fred, Spoiler:if you wait on the balcony above Fred and Bilby's bedroom until night time, at some point, Fred will emerge and walk to the castle's throne room. If you follow him there, you will be treated with an extravagant rock performance where Fred is dressed up as his idol and namesake Freddie Mercury, the frontman of the British rock band Queen.

If you go into Fred and Bilby's bedroom, Spoiler:Fred's side of the room is adorned with Freddie Mercury and Queen posters, even on his bedsheets, hinting at this connection.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Hotel Mario
As Mario and Luigi approach Ludwig's hotel, Mario comments "We ain't afraid'a no Koopas!", a reference to the theme song to the 1984 film "Ghostbusters".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Hotel Mario
After Mario, Luigi and the Princess run out of Lemmy's hotel, a giant fan is switched on blowing Lemmy and the hotel away, to which Mario says "Hey you! Get off of my cloud!". This is a reference to The Rolling Stones' 1965 song "Get Off of My Cloud".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Homeworld's closing theme "Homeworld (The Ladder)" was composed by the British progressive rock band Yes for the game. It was originally released on the band's 1999 album "The Ladder" eight days before the release of Homeworld. The collaboration was spearheaded by lead singer Jon Anderson who wanted a piece of Yes' music to be worked into a video game, which resulted in the band discovering and becoming interested in Homeworld's plot and development, writing lyrics that fit with the themes of the game such as "thoughts that we're all trying to find our way home". Sierra Studios CEO Alex Garden commented that they tried to do as much as they could to tie the real world into their games to enhance the experience and provide a grounding in reality, and that the collaboration with Yes just came together with that philosophy.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
Normally, if you change the music selection to "Choose" in the Audio menu, the game will not allow the track "Prophetic - Title" to play. However, a glitch in the European version causes the song to play if the player loops through the list by pressing D-Right after the last song. This is the only way the song can be played in-game, though the game will change the song to "Azule Lux" every time a new level is loaded.

This is most likely caused by the game trying to play "Extol", as it was the last track in the US version. Since its placement was changed, the game loops the list and plays "Prophetic" instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
The song "Flim Flam" is not present in the European version. The Brick variation which used this song now uses "Extol" instead, which is also the song that replaced it on the Audio menu.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Developer: Namco Bandai
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In 1984, Namco's sound team released Video Game Music, a compilation album produced by Yellow Magic Orchestra bandleader Haruomi Hosono that gathered together various songs from Namco's arcade games. While not the first album to incorporate video game music (being predated by Yellow Magic Orchestra's self-titled debut in 1978), it was the first to consist entirely of it. In turn, Namco composers Shinji Hosoe, Nobuyoshi Sano, Takayuki Aihara, and Hiroto Sasaki would later form Oriental Magnetic Yellow, a parody group based on Yellow Magic Orchestra.
Contributed by game4brains
The main theme for the game is a cover version of "Rydeen", a 1979 song by Japanese synth-pop supergroup Yellow Magic Orchestra.
Contributed by game4brains
Halo: Combat Evolved
For the premiere demo of Halo: Combat Evolved at MacWorld 1999, Marty O'Donnell and Michael Salvatori were tasked to create music for the demo within three days. They were directed to make the song that would become the Halo series' main theme sound "ancient, mysterious and epic". While driving to Salvatori's home, O'Donnell brainstormed the song and its core melody:

"[A]s I was driving, I thought 'Okay, ancient...you know, monks are ancient, so I'm going to start with some sort of monk chant, and it's got to be hook-y, it's got to stick in people's heads and then we'll go on to something sort of epic and pounding; cellos and drums, and stuff.'

I've always analyzed [the melody to "Yesterday" by The Beatles]; it's got one high point, it's got one low point, it's got four sort of irregular phrases...

So, [the Halo theme is]...not a copy of the Yesterday melody, but the Yesterday melody inspired me to put that together, because I thought, 'Well, if I have one high point, one low point, to four irregular phrases but still do a legitimate monk chant melody...it may be able to have legs.'"

The song was recorded the day prior to MacWorld 1999 by three jingle singers, O'Donnell and Salvatori, accompanied by a string sextet of four violins and two cellos. O'Donnell requested one of the jingle singers to perform the Qawwali-like voice solo during the string melody, but upon hearing O'Donnell's example, it was decided O'Donnell would sing the solo instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
EarthBound
The music that plays in Onett's Arcade contains brief snippets of the main theme of Xevious, and of the bonus theme from Nintendo's 1979 arcade game Sheriff.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
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