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Hotel Mario
As Mario and Luigi approach Ludwig's hotel, Mario comments "We ain't afraid'a no Koopas!", a reference to the theme song to the 1984 film "Ghostbusters".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Hotel Mario
After Mario, Luigi and the Princess run out of Lemmy's hotel, a giant fan is switched on blowing Lemmy and the hotel away, to which Mario says "Hey you! Get off of my cloud!". This is a reference to The Rolling Stones' 1965 song "Get Off of My Cloud".
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Homeworld's closing theme "Homeworld (The Ladder)" was composed by the British progressive rock band Yes for the game. It was originally released on the band's 1999 album "The Ladder" eight days before the release of Homeworld. The collaboration was spearheaded by lead singer Jon Anderson who wanted a piece of Yes' music to be worked into a video game, which resulted in the band discovering and becoming interested in Homeworld's plot and development, writing lyrics that fit with the themes of the game such as "thoughts that we're all trying to find our way home". Sierra Studios CEO Alex Garden commented that they tried to do as much as they could to tie the real world into their games to enhance the experience and provide a grounding in reality, and that the collaboration with Yes just came together with that philosophy.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
Normally, if you change the music selection to "Choose" in the Audio menu, the game will not allow the track "Prophetic - Title" to play. However, a glitch in the European version causes the song to play if the player loops through the list by pressing D-Right after the last song. This is the only way the song can be played in-game, though the game will change the song to "Azule Lux" every time a new level is loaded.

This is most likely caused by the game trying to play "Extol", as it was the last track in the US version. Since its placement was changed, the game loops the list and plays "Prophetic" instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Tetrisphere
The song "Flim Flam" is not present in the European version. The Brick variation which used this song now uses "Extol" instead, which is also the song that replaced it on the Audio menu.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Developer: Namco Bandai
Attachment
In 1984, Namco's sound team released Video Game Music, a compilation album produced by Yellow Magic Orchestra bandleader Haruomi Hosono that gathered together various songs from Namco's arcade games. While not the first album to incorporate video game music (being predated by Yellow Magic Orchestra's self-titled debut in 1978), it was the first to consist entirely of it. In turn, Namco composers Shinji Hosoe, Nobuyoshi Sano, Takayuki Aihara, and Hiroto Sasaki would later form Oriental Magnetic Yellow, a parody group based on Yellow Magic Orchestra.
Contributed by game4brains
The main theme for the game is a cover version of "Rydeen", a 1979 song by Japanese synth-pop supergroup Yellow Magic Orchestra.
Contributed by game4brains
Halo: Combat Evolved
For the premiere demo of Halo: Combat Evolved at MacWorld 1999, Marty O'Donnell and Michael Salvatori were tasked to create music for the demo within three days. They were directed to make the song that would become the Halo series' main theme sound "ancient, mysterious and epic". While driving to Salvatori's home, O'Donnell brainstormed the song and its core melody:

"[A]s I was driving, I thought 'Okay, ancient...you know, monks are ancient, so I'm going to start with some sort of monk chant, and it's got to be hook-y, it's got to stick in people's heads and then we'll go on to something sort of epic and pounding; cellos and drums, and stuff.'

I've always analyzed [the melody to "Yesterday" by The Beatles]; it's got one high point, it's got one low point, it's got four sort of irregular phrases...

So, [the Halo theme is]...not a copy of the Yesterday melody, but the Yesterday melody inspired me to put that together, because I thought, 'Well, if I have one high point, one low point, to four irregular phrases but still do a legitimate monk chant melody...it may be able to have legs.'"

The song was recorded the day prior to MacWorld 1999 by three jingle singers, O'Donnell and Salvatori, accompanied by a string sextet of four violins and two cellos. O'Donnell requested one of the jingle singers to perform the Qawwali-like voice solo during the string melody, but upon hearing O'Donnell's example, it was decided O'Donnell would sing the solo instead.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
EarthBound
The music that plays in Onett's Arcade contains brief snippets of the main theme of Xevious, and of the bonus theme from Nintendo's 1979 arcade game Sheriff.
Contributed by MehDeletingLater
Present in the game's PC port is an unused electronic remix of the "Radiator Springs Theme" used on the pause menu and main menu from the game Cars. In the final release of that game, only the regular theme is used.
Contributed by billebobfacts
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder's Revenge
According to YouTube guitarist Jonny Atma on his Twitter account, he stated that he provided most of the guitar parts for the game's soundtrack, and that he also did the vocals for the "Panic in the Sky!" song.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The opening guitar riff heard in May's theme "Blue Water, Blue Sky" is very similar to one that can be found in Skid Row's song "Forever".
Contributed by ShiftyBadger
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated in the description for "Under the Stars" that he figures “‘I should write a normal song’, but when I do, oh my!” He also commented that the frequency range on the song’s instrumentation was “a little overstuffed”.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that when his older brother Sakimoto heard the "Night Attack" theme, he said to Iwata that the theme sounded like it was done by a foreigner trying to write something that sounds "Japanese". Iwata took it as a harsh comment, but agreed with him, admitting that he was too influenced by playing a lot of Western games at the time. He really wanted the atmosphere to feel like a night raid, but the latter half of the song "sounds like all the soldiers are dancing around or something".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time
In a 1999 commentary with the game's composer Koji Kondo published in the GSLA archive, he stated that when "Ocarina" became the game's title, he decided to try and build the music around one central ocarina melody. Given that the ocarina only has five notes to play, he tried to write the various background themes in different genres (bolero, serenade, etc.) where each one would evoke a "catchy, memorable 3-note ocarina melody". This was the motif around which he created various simple, but distinct melodies, and was very careful to make sure he didn't repeat himself. Kondo then commented:

"Game music is different from other genres in that it exists to make the game more enjoyable. In addition, there's a lot of interactive things you can do with game music, which I think is one of its defining traits. A very simple example would be the way the tempo increases when a time limit is running out."

Kondo also stated the Hyrule Field theme is the main central song, and that he wrote it so that each time you play it, the song structure unfolds in a slightly different way. He also stated that when Link stands still for a while, the song will change to a more relaxed melody, and when enemies come close, the song will get tenser. Since it is a very long game, he tried to think of ways to keep the players from getting bored, and how to make the music evolve with what's happening on-screen. He hoped to continue pursuing this idea for interactive music in future games.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Fatal Fury 3: Road to the Final Victory
In a 1995 interview with the SNK Sound Team published in Neo Geo Freak Magazine, composers Shimizm and Konny stated that the team wanted to change up the patterns and image of each song, as they had to compose a large number of songs for each game they worked on while also adding something new into the image of earlier versions of songs and also relating to what the game was trying to express. By doing this, they set up a distinct identity for each game, always searching to make things more "real":

Shimizm: "Basically, these are fighting games, and their core is a system of gameplay that I endeavor to match with my music. What is the game itself trying to express…? That's where I look for my themes. For sound effects too, for example, with punches, I try to make them as realistic as possible. I place a lot of importance on that."
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Masaharu Iwata, he stated that the "Decisive Battle" felt out of step with the game's historical period. He felt it was more like "a muscle-bound action hero wielding a gatling gun in one hand", instead of wielding sword and sorcery, and apologized if it sounded a little phoned in, adding "I'd do it differently now".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he joked that he wrote "Bloody Excrement" while he was thinking about the game's protagonist, Mr. Forest Bear, a "pleasant, heartwarming tale of Mr. Bear’s family adventure, that's really never explained", and that his original idea for the song was to make it feel like a pleasant, heartwarming story of Mr. Bear’s family adventure.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that he'd tried to evoke "the feeling that you were fighting in the midst of mother nature all around you" for "A Chapel".
Contributed by ProtoSnake
Final Fantasy Tactics
In the Japanese version's commentary with the game's composer Hitoshi Sakimoto, he stated that the "Random Waltz" theme was his very first battle theme he wrote, and it served as something like a test for different sampling techniques he wanted to experiment with, which he found very memorable. He also stated that, at the time of this interview, when he thought back on when he wrote the theme, it felt like it was 5 years ago, but it was actually only half a year.
Contributed by ProtoSnake
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